Help with dismantling an early Furlex

bluerm166

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Am assisting a friend in attempt to remove and renew the forestay within an early Furlex.
The item is shown in album at :
https://photos.app.goo.gl/hnaUgYDcH69Yp9Q89

The difficulty is that the unit appears to be earlier than any models for which manuals are available i.e . it is not Models A to D and judging by the use of hefty stainless plates for the drum flanges it is likely to be earlier.
So although the bottom eye and the female unit into which the cable end on its wedge cone is driven work in a 'standard' fashion the body of the actual female unit differs.
Does anyone please have first hand knowledge of how the wedge cone is loosened and in addition the function of the two grub screws which appear only on our component and not on all other models.
So far we have followed the instructions for other models , i.e. loosening the eye on the thread and then driving the eye on the axis of the stay - without effect - and in this case wonder if the grub screws are significant and not holding the bearing together.

We would be grateful for any hands on knowledge while the components are soaking in plus gas overnight.
 

paulajayne

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Looks like the Allen screw needs to be loosened or removed and then the unit pushed up the cable as I imagine that there is a cone in the centre of the cable.
 

rszemeti

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I think the grub screws are key to this ...

Imagine the forestay assemebled, without the furlex drum, but with the end on the Stalok fitting .. the forestay itself, the stainless bit with the grub screw in it and the eye that you have removed are all that is taking the strain. The Furlex drum just sits on the top of the fitting, held in place by the grub screws.

Loosen/remove the grub screws and I think you will be able to slide the drum assembly up ... or if you prefer, pull the wire terminal down.

Then I would cut the forestay a few cm above the top of the terminal and use hammers to knock the remaining bit of forestay wire and the wedge/cone out of the terminal.
 

Seajet

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I have not worked on a Furlex but two things spring to mind; those grub screws sound pretty important to me, try to grease them and have a big tissue under to catch them in case the shear loads they have endured make it seem best to get replacements one way or another - buy if poss or if in doubt just get new ones made, it seems a silly design but these grub screws sound vital, I'd get some spares too but it doesn't sound a good idea at sea except in near emergency.

Watch out for ball bearings dropping out with any roller system - I was with a chum photographing the process of his dismantling his Rotostay - he'd meant to line the bits with grease and put a small bucket under as he dsmantled the thing - but he is a gungo ho ' let's just spanner it ' type -we both forgot this vital grease and bucket bit of the procedure...

, I reckon we recovered maybe 80% of the balls - but as the sytem was already knackered and he'd seen my similar boat go a lot better with hanked headsails ( for a 22'. above 30' I'd go for rollers ) the rotostay went into File 13...:)
 
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bluerm166

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Many thanks to all respondents.
Despite the difference between the model in hand and those for which manuals are available in the end it responded to the same brute force of a club hammer applied to the loosened bottom eye along the axis of the stay and the grub screws proved to be insignificant.
I note that some riggers on you tube apply a generous amount of silicone to be squeezed soild around the cone/cable as it is fully tightened.There was some gunge around ours which would not have helped.
Thanks again.
 
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