Help: Radio instuctions

Andrew_Fanner

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13 Mar 2002
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ked into poverty by children
Well, we spent the cash and bought the boat, a new to us Fjord 27. On board is a VHF set with no current trace of the instructions.

The set says SMR SL8500 on the front and Southern Marine Research on the
serial number label. A quick shufti at the web for a maker wasn't a
success. Anyone any idea about a website and/or source of the
instruction manual? Even with a licence (course pending) the fiddle and
see what happens approach seems rather unwise.

Thanks for any help.
 

LORDNELSON

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Can you explain your dilemma to a fellow sailor either in your club, marina or mooring area? A few minutes instruction from someone who knows about VHF procedure will probably solve your problem. Most VHF radios are fairly simple once you know how to proceed and a few minutes instruction should make all plain. A "fiddle with it approach" should pay dividends so long as you have the necessary information to prevent you transmitting whilst you fiddle - good luck. Barry
 

hlb

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Dont know much about the one your talking about.
You should have about 4 main controls. Volume also acts as on-of switch usually. There will be some numbers in a screen. Turn to chanel 16. Or 80 if you've got a manned marina close by. Squelch control. Turn clockwise till interference stops, but no further. Some where it will say 1 wat or 25 watt. Switch to 25. Coast guards wont mind you doing a radio check but use a friendly marina if possible. Also if your up a creek, you might not get anyone, cos it works on line of sight.

Anyway. pick up the mike and press the button usually on the back. Say the name of the coast guard station three times. Ie. "Solent Coast guard" x 3. Then. " This is Yacht xxxxx" Three times. Then say "Over" Dont forget to take your finger off the button when you've finished. You may have to try again if no responce. Try about three times. But no more or you will just cause problems for others. When they answer. Press button and say. " Please can I have a radio check. Over" Take finger off button. They will tell you whether your signal is good or bad. Dont worry, if your parked up some place it will be bad anyway.

Have you sent off Your Stamped. SAE and cheque. Yet.

Haydn
 

coliholic

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Oh it's definitely a "fiddle and see" job. Switch it on. Something should then happen. Lights will come on, little numbers will come on in the dispalay. Press a button or turn a knob till you get to Channel 16. Then you should hear someone talking, 'cos there's always lots of chatter on 16. If so, then you know its got power and receiving, if not turn the volume right up and if it goes all sort of crackly you'll find another knob called "Squelch" or maybe just "Sq", often inside the volume control knob. Turn that till the crackly noise just disappears. Then turn the volume to a manageable or normal level. Keep playing with these two till you get reception at the volume you want.

Now try tuning to different channels and listen to what's being said. After a while you'll get familiar with the way everyone chats, so now it's time for you to do a radio check. Since you haven't got a licence yet, you don't want to give the game away too much, so have a look round the marina. See any boats with radio aerials and no-one on board? Remember the boat's name. Now pick up the microphone, though we tend to call them "Mike's" it's not his, it's yours. There'll be a button on this handset mike somewhere. This is called the PTT button. Press To Talk. Still on Ch 16, listen to how other boats ask for a radio check. When there's a lull in the chatter, it's your go. Press the PTT and holding it down say, "(whatever radio station is in your area, whatevever radio station is in your area), this is (boat name that you've nicked, boat name that you've nicked). Radio check please over". Then let go of the PTT. When someone replies, panic. Either switch the radio off and have a look round in case someone saw you or, press the PTT, say " (boat name that you've nicked), thank you sir, standing by, out". Release PTT. Wipe sweat from brow. Decide you will do a radio course and buy a licence. Have a beer and grin smugly, You're another rung up the ladder.

Always call everyone on the radio "sir", it make's 'em feel ever so important and they'll be awfully helpful to you. Not so good if it's a lady answering though.
 

coliholic

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Oops started writing it then got interrupoted and came back and finished it only to find H had copied what I was saying. So not only has he got a burger he's got a telescope too and is copying what I write.

So two pieces of good advice eh?
 

BarryH

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But wot you dont mention is that if you get caught the man from the RA will say " Good morning Sir, have we been a naughty boy, Sir, installing and transmitting on unlicenced equipment, Sir. That'll be a fine of upto £2000 pounds please,Sir, and oh, by the way, Sir, give me the radio equipment Sir. How important will you feel then <G>
 
G

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I did a one day VHF radio short range course at the Portsmouth Outdoor Centre a while back. I think they only do them once or twice a year though
 

rogerm

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13 Mar 2002
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If you would really like to play without any problem with upsetting anyone then go to Maplins (or similar electronic shop) and ask to buy a 50 ohm dummy load, the sort they use for CB radios. Strickly speaking you should get a 25 watt one but a 10 watt one will do as long as you don't hole the PTT button for too long. You screw it into the aerial in place of the real one. You can then do, fiddle to your hearts content.... Of course you won't hear anyone else or get any replies.... but at least you can practise..
Roger
 
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