Fuel Tank position

rmgcsj

New member
Joined
11 Oct 2004
Messages
13
Location
Devon, England
My old fuel tank for my Yanmar was a S/S Tank located above and behind the engine. Can anyone tell me if there is any regulation to where a tank is fitted. I am looking to replace the tank with one made of plastic. Do you have to have a fuel tap and if you do could this be near the fuel trap in the engine compartment.
 

silverseal

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Joined
26 Jun 2003
Messages
230
Location
Solent City, Hampshire,UK
Most engine makers recommend that you periodically remove the tanks and thoroughly clean it to prevent both physical debris and biological growth from blocking the fule filters etc. I seriously suggest that you have a shutoff valve on the tank - probably in the "permanently on" position, but allowing for shutoff when moving the tank. You can of course have a second shutoff adjacent to the engine. My Watermota is 28 years old and seems to have been run with the fuel in the "on " position for the last 28 years!
 

supermalc

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Joined
14 Dec 2003
Messages
539
Location
Lincolnshire.
I have just replaced my fuel tank on my 20ft Mahogany clinker, which I have to have a Boat Safety Certificate for BW rivers. The boat has a YSE12.
The tank is a simple affair of gravity feed, nestling in a wooden box that doubles as a seat. Partly my own fault this is the third tank I've used. Because regulation dictates the filler must be outside, I first used a small tank I had 'in stock', which I welded a neck to go to the outside of the wheelhouse. Fuel flow problems caused me to revert to the original tank that came with the boat, but this original stuart turner tank really required replacing.

Frightening prices of £100 to £140 ruled out plastic tanks on economic ground.....however I have found a new outboard tank at a local jumble, and a new tap, plus tank has cost £25.40. I fitted the tap by drilling a hole in the bottom. The filler has a plastic pipe to the outside, so keeping inside the regulations.

You local hydraulic supplies should have an appropriate tap in stock, which should be fitted under the tank. If the pipe was fractured, or burnt you would have no means of stopping the fuel flow if fitted near the engine; in the event of a fire for instance.
 

tugboat

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Joined
1 May 2004
Messages
1,475
Location
Devon
I agree with silverseal that you must have a valve on the tank itself. It must be easily accessible so that it can be turned off in the event of a fire in the engine compartment. If accessibilty is a problem you can rig a remote via a cable to close it. Nothing to stop you having another one in a more convenient place, but it is generally recommended that the fuel line is left turned on and charged so that no air can get in at a less than perfect joint somewhere in the system. Most peoples' diesel tanks never get turned off, though it is a good idea to exercise the valve occasionally to ensure it is free if you need it in emergency.
 
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