DIY Copper Coat

RichardS

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Certainly copper coating with self-selected epoxy and copper powder is not that unusual but I wonder how carefully the particle size of the copper powder can or has been specified and how erodable the selected epoxy is and how much those two variables affect the final performance?

Richard
 

Boo2

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Anyone ever heard of anyone applying copper foil to the bottom of their boat after epoxying it ? Should work as well as or better than CC I'd have thought ?

Boo2
 

lukedh

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Anyone ever heard of anyone applying copper foil to the bottom of their boat after epoxying it ? Should work as well as or better than CC I'd have thought ?

Boo2


This used to be done, I remember it written up in, Small Boat? in the 70's. It must have fallen out of favour, it has been mentioned on hear before.
 

vyv_cox

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Anyone ever heard of anyone applying copper foil to the bottom of their boat after epoxying it ? Should work as well as or better than CC I'd have thought ?

Boo2

A commercial system using copper 'tiles' was introduced around five years ago. Dick Durham of YM used it on his Contessa 32, with disastrous results. Although the copper was fouling free the joints between each tile were not. Having paid a lot of money for the application of these things he was less than pleased to find at haul-out that a boat whose owner had painted its hull with emulsion paint was less fouled than his.
 

Twister_Ken

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Anyone ever heard of anyone applying copper foil to the bottom of their boat after epoxying it ? Should work as well as or better than CC I'd have thought ?

Boo2

I was a guinea pig for the copper tiles on my Twister. It was used only on the rudder. Looked fantastic when just applied, but very quickly the fouling between the tiles overwhelmed it. It was then an absolute booger to remove and return to good ol' Blakes Tiger.
 

Tranona

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Certainly copper coating with self-selected epoxy and copper powder is not that unusual but I wonder how carefully the particle size of the copper powder can or has been specified and how erodable the selected epoxy is and how much those two variables affect the final performance?

Richard

Been tried and failed. At least one firm ended up in court over failure.

There have been many attempts at copper coating over the years and most have failed either technically or commercially and only the Coppercoat has survived for long enough to find out if it works.
 

JumbleDuck

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There have been many attempts at copper coating over the years and most have failed either technically or commercially and only the Coppercoat has survived for long enough to find out if it works.

Even Coppercoat seems pretty hit-and-miss, with many reports of good performance and many of unsatisfactory results. And even when it works, it may not be economically viable for some people. It costs me £50 and two hours of my time per annum to use antifoul and I have no fouling issues at all. It just wouldn't make sense to spend £1,500 for ten years worth of Coppercoat.

For people who keep boats in high-fouling areas all year it may well be very different.
 

Tranona

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Even Coppercoat seems pretty hit-and-miss, with many reports of good performance and many of unsatisfactory results. And even when it works, it may not be economically viable for some people. It costs me £50 and two hours of my time per annum to use antifoul and I have no fouling issues at all. It just wouldn't make sense to spend £1,500 for ten years worth of Coppercoat.

For people who keep boats in high-fouling areas all year it may well be very different.

Hopefully a bit better than "hit and miss". Less is heard from the large numbers of successful applications than from the few that might not be so good - and the company has been selling it successfully for nearly 20 years. Used by all the major repair yards and on a wide range of both new and older boats.

As to the economics for some (like me!) it is potentially very worthwhile - which is why I bought it. I anticipate one haulout a year to change anodes and pressure wash. Cost £75. Compared with conventional haulout and storage £400 plus antifoul (what a lousy job when you are in your 8th decade) £100. So 10 years total £750 against £5000. cost of Coppercoat £3500.

Bargain if i live that long!

But you are right it is, like most things, not the same for everybody. Not everybody looks forward that long, nor sees the annual AF routine a chore to be avoided. Many people always have their boats out in the winter rather than keeping them afloat all year round.

So, we all have to make our own decisions - and live with the consequences.
 

ronsurf

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I've always thought of coppercoat as one of those things that benefits the next owner. Good selling point, possibly. Before you get it you have to honestly decide whether you are going to keep the boat for 10 years +
 

vyv_cox

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For reasons I won't go into here we finished up with only the keel Coppercoated, the hull is conventionally antifouled. We have been very pleased to avoid the additional chore of painting the keel every year, even though in area terms it doesn't amount to a lot. As age takes over it is far more pleasant not to have to paint the most awkward places.
 

Tranona

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I've always thought of coppercoat as one of those things that benefits the next owner. Good selling point, possibly. Before you get it you have to honestly decide whether you are going to keep the boat for 10 years +

Had one boat for 35 years, last one for 15. However to me the choice was as much about avoiding the unpleasant work as the straight financial savings.
 

JumbleDuck

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I've always thought of coppercoat as one of those things that benefits the next owner. Good selling point, possibly. Before you get it you have to honestly decide whether you are going to keep the boat for 10 years +

It only lasts ten years, apparently, so whether you keep it longer than that doesn't really matter.
 

duncan99210

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It only lasts ten years, apparently, so whether you keep it longer than that doesn't really matter.

Coppercoat was applied to our boat when new. After fifteen years, we applied a new lot of Coppercoat this spring as the old coating was wearing thin in places after being abraded a couple of times to expose fresh copper.

We've found that it doesn't stop all marine growth but it does slow it down at least as much as conventional antifoul. However, the real bonus is that a quick pressure wash and it ready for relaunch with no tedious reapplication of yet more coats of conventional antifoul.

It cost us about six days hard work to key the existing coating for the new stuff and apply the new. The actual Coppercoat was about £600 for a 12m sail boat.
 
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