Curtains

Boathook

Well-known member
Joined
5 Oct 2001
Messages
8,049
Location
Surrey & boat in Dorset.
Visit site
I'm going to get new curtains this year once I have chosen the material and dragged some money out of a deep pocket. The main concern is, is there another way of securing the bottom edge apart from using the sliders back to back. The window leans in by about 30 degrees and is on a curve so the use of a curtain wire is impractical if not impossible. Hopefully the pictures show how it is presently done which has worked for many years, but does mean that machining needs to be accurate. The top image needs to be rotated 90 degrees clockwise as the forum systems thinks it knows best!

20190323_203029 1.jpg

20190325_082257.jpg
 
Joined
30 May 2013
Messages
444
Visit site
we made curtains on our boat and never had a bottom rail - The old ones just had a couple of loops in the bottom on a little elastic hoop so i got some new elastic "rope" from the local haberdashery and made new curtains with new hoops.

im not the best at sewing / curtain making but this is what they look like with a navy blue back lining and pleated? front

WG3U4eT.png


FWIW cost me £40 for 7 curtains including all the material, thread, etc - i reused the old hooks etc
 
Last edited:

Neeves

Well-known member
Joined
20 Nov 2011
Messages
12,600
Location
Sydney, Australia.
Visit site
Maybe a flexible rod, fibreglass tent pole, sail batten, thin dowel, thin drain cleaning rod. Secure at each end, obviously and somewhere in the centre to achieve the desired curve. Rod, obviously, passes through the hem, or sleave in the curtain with a 'cut out' where you secure the rod in roughly its centre.

Jonathan
 

LittleSister

Well-known member
Joined
12 Nov 2007
Messages
18,177
Location
Me Norfolk/Suffolk border - Boat Deben & Southwold
Visit site
You could perhaps attach the hooks to the header tape using elastic thread to give the arrangement some additional flexibility.

I disagree with Neeves that a rod, or similar, should 'obviously' pass through the hem of the curtain. that's one way to go, but having the rod or whatever in front of the curtain, slightly above its bottom, will make it much easier to open and close them. The aesthetics of the arrangement could go one way or the other, depending on details.

Re 'black-out' lining: as i mentioned on the previous thread, this doesn't actually need to be black. You can get white and cream lining (or curtain) material which blocks the light, and not all black fabric will keep the light out. The light-blocking qualities depend on the material and the tightness of the weave, not its colour.
 

Hydrozoan

Well-known member
Joined
11 Apr 2013
Messages
10,035
Visit site
... I disagree with Neeves that a rod, or similar, should 'obviously' pass through the hem of the curtain. that's one way to go, but having the rod or whatever in front of the curtain, slightly above its bottom, will make it much easier to open and close them. The aesthetics of the arrangement could go one way or the other, depending on details. ...

I agree with you, and rod/flat holdbacks in front of the curtains are good if their tops and bottoms are not exactly parallel. I made mine from teak-stained hardwood D-moulding screwed to the cabin inner liner through standoffs cut from fine aluminium tube, but one could use (at greater cost) proprietary SS gallery rail and fittings – not uncommon for narrowboat curtains, I believe (see e.g. https://ahbrass.co.uk/tube-fittings/fiddle-rail-fittings)
 

LittleSister

Well-known member
Joined
12 Nov 2007
Messages
18,177
Location
Me Norfolk/Suffolk border - Boat Deben & Southwold
Visit site
one could use (at greater cost) proprietary SS gallery rail and fittings

I am still searching for proprietary holdback fittings that will accommodate, without stand-offs, a 6 foot + length, a slope one end to the other, and a concave curve to the cabin side, whilst blending in nicely with the 1970s Scandi decor! :D
 
Top