Cheap Channel Islands Chandlery

Gryphon2

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Is there any difference in taxes on chandlery bought in the different Channe;l Islands.? I want to pick up an EPIRB there before going off to the Caribbean this summer. Any recommendations for particular chandleries? I bought some stuff 10 years ago from Blue Water Supplies but their web site does not seem to function now.
 

Bobc

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Things tend to be more expensive on the islands. Cheapest is to buy online.
 

Jim@sea

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I needed a replacement battery in alderney and it was more expensive even without the VAT. The higher costs are due, I believe, to the transportation costs!
I once bought two batteries from a Channel Island Boat Yard, I insisted on a brand which was sold in the UK.
On my trip from the Channel Islands to the UK "both" batteries failed, fortunately at the time the engine was running and I limped into Southern Ireland where I jumped into a Taxi and went to a Cork Car Accessory Shop and bought another one.
Back in the UK I took the faulty batteries back to the Manufacturer (Exide) and on inspection they said that they were from a faulty batch and had been "recalled"
Perhaps its the high transport costs which made the Boatyard not return them
 

johnalison

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There is a general rule that goods on islands are more expensive than on the mainland. I have generally found this to be the case for things such as food, gas and basic stuff, unless there is some major discount on duty such as the booze on Heligoland. Even nearby islands such as the Frisians tend to be expensive, as well as being tourist traps.
 

Gryphon2

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I have been surprised by the answers so far as I understood that VAT or its equivalent was significantly lower in the Ch Is and that was reflected in prices. I bought a number of things there in 2008 including a SW radio with a big saving on UK mainland prices.
 

LittleSister

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In addition to the transport costs, there is the factor of 'the price the market will bear'. When many (most?) of your customers are a captive audience (island residents and passing visitors) there may be limited advantage from pricing lower. I suspect one or both those factors usually cancels out any tax advantage.

I haven't spent much chandlery time/attention/money when visiting there, but I didn't notice anything that looked particularly bargain-like.
 

Appledore

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I have been surprised by the answers so far as I understood that VAT or its equivalent was significantly lower in the Ch Is and that was reflected in prices. I bought a number of things there in 2008 including a SW radio with a big saving on UK mainland prices.

Well, things do change with time. 3 years ago we went to Guernsey with the car (Poole ferry). Car diesel fuel was quite a lot cheaper than in the UK. So last year we went back with the car with minimal diesel in the tank, only to find the forecourt prices were now much higher than in the UK! Still, twice around the Island by car doesn't use much fuel, LOL!
 

gjgm

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Things tend to be more expensive on the islands. Cheapest is to buy online.

Agreed. Even in UK prices vary depending on the buying power of the chandlery chain.I would say the CI is about the same price as a small local chandlery, more than the big UK firms-online prices.
No bargains!
 

guernseyman

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Historically the cost of living in the CI was low, and with no VAT and low duties there were bargains to be had for visitors.
But then our economies changed as we became an off-shoot of the City of London with an influx of relatively well-paid employees. Slowly but surely local businesses found they could increase prices and still do business.
 
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