Calshot RNLI call outs - emergencies?

alant

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From Local paper -

"fouled propellors, grounding & broken engines kept both Calshot RNLI lifeboats busy on Sunday.

The first call came at 6am for the crew of 248 squadron RAF lifeboat to remove a fouled anchor rope around the propellor of a 14' angling boat in trouble at the entrance to the Beaulieu River.

The second alert was at 4pm when both the stations lifeboats were called to assist 5 yachts, all over 40', aground at the entrance to the Beaulieu River.
After laying out anchors for the stricken vessels, the all waether lifeboat returned to station leaving the inshore rescue craft to wait until the sailing boats were refloated on the incoming tide.

On the way back to the lifeboat station, the inshore crew went to the assistance of a 25' yacht with engine failure. It was taken in tow to Calshot where the lifeboatmen helped the yacht's skipper to fix his engine"

:rolleyes:
 

alant

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Good seamanship?

To wonder why the RNLI is spending its hard-won cash keeping a lifeboat on station for several hours to look after five big yachts which have - horrors - actually run aground, I imagine.

Obviously didn't read the almanac, or missed the day when secondary ports were being explained on DS course.

But did it need a lifeboat?
Were lives at risk?

One 40' er, I can accept, but surely the other 4 following would have noticed something was amiss!
What happened to keeping a good lookout?

Did any of these 'rescues' need a lifeboat?

For the 40+'ers, the time of day - 4pm & on a Sunday, suggests that they probably needed to get back to the marina for onward travel to dayjob on Monday.
More inconvenience than anything else, with tide not cooperating in supplying enough depth. Couldn't possibly have anchored off until entrance was OK. Might have to go in in the dark! :rolleyes:
 

Seajet

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Yes, but did anyone actually request a lifeboat ?

The RNLI have a habit of claiming 'lives saved' etc when trying to justify their self importance - all this will go into the annual 'rescue' figures - and anyway this all sounds like good practice for the crew and lifeboat on a Sunday.
 

jhr

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Obviously didn't read the almanac, or missed the day when secondary ports were being explained on DS course. ......

.....More inconvenience than anything else, with tide not cooperating in supplying enough depth. Couldn't possibly have anchored off until entrance was OK. Might have to go in in the dark! :rolleyes:

The entrance to the Beaulieu can be shallow at LW, particularly at springs, and in a 40ft yot you'd be wise to follow the instructions in every almanac or guide that I have ever read, namely: "do not attempt to enter the river two hours either side of low water". Ninety nine times out of a hundred you will probably get away with it, but close to the equinox, and with the moon at perigee, it's probably not a good bet.....

Good thing they got stuck outside the entrance or the Harbourmaster would have been round to collect the mooring fees :)
 

l'escargot

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Solent coastguard would have tasked the lifeboat on each of these occasions. I am sure they have protocols agreed with the RNLI and all these call outs would have been considered appropriate by both organisations.
 

fien397

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Yes, but did anyone actually request a lifeboat ?

The RNLI have a habit of claiming 'lives saved' etc when trying to justify their self importance - all this will go into the annual 'rescue' figures - and anyway this all sounds like good practice for the crew and lifeboat on a Sunday.


While i agree it was good practice, i can assure you that none of the jobs above will go down as lives saved. The RNLI is very selective about what counts as a life saved, which pretty much comes down to would they have died if the lifeboat had not intervened. The answer of course is no. The other side of this, is the unbeliveable things people do when they are out of control and panic. What may not seem as grave and iminent danger initially, if not addressed, it could well be 6 hours down the line. Regarding the RNLI's self improtance, from the "sharp" end, this is simply not true. However, as the Institute grows, i cant help but feel that those at HQ may be loosing sight of whats going on on station.
 

pvb

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To wonder why the RNLI is spending its hard-won cash keeping a lifeboat on station for several hours to look after five big yachts which have - horrors - actually run aground, I imagine.

Because the RNLI is a business, a big rich business, which relies on big results to get even more income. So the statistics are important - the more "rescues" the better. The assets have been paid for, and the crew comes free, so why not use them? The little old ladies who give money to the RNLI thinking it's saving seafarers in peril will never know that it's become almost a marine version of the RAC in some places.
 

oldharry

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Its the lawyers fault, not the RNLI. Or HMCG. The grounded yachts would have radioed in to inform CG of the grounding, and may even have reported they were OK, and not in danger. HMCG tucked up in their office at Lee on Solent have no way of knowing whether the skippers assessment is correct and would have tasked the LB anyway to stand by in case the situation changes.

RNLI having been tasked by CG, arrive on scene and find all is well.

Supposing they had gone home again, the situation HAD changed and loss of life followed...?

Lawyers would have had a field day arguing whose fault it was that the rescue services were not there.

In todays wretched 'compensation culture' resue services have a nightmare trying to risk assess a potentially dangerous situation, so will wait with a potential casualty until the risk is resolved rather than stand down.

There was the story of the woman down West Wales who was cut off by the tide, but knew she was safe enough where she was. RNLI and Cg stood by for I think 6 hours, 'in case'. while she insisted she did NOT want or need to be 'rescued'. Gives me a lovely mental picture.... :)
 

SolentBoat

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I do sometime wonder, with engine failure on yachts, what the sails are for!:rolleyes:

Indeed. I've been amused by C16 calls from mid-Solent yachts who have suffered engine failure on perfect sailing days.

I realise that when it comes to mucking around on the water then discretion and a call for a tow is often the better part of valour but why not sail to your destination and then see what your friendly HM, marina chaps or other boaties can do?

Did it myself a few weeks back; HM was more than happy to help rather than encourage sailing onto pontoon show off antics.

Never crossed my mind to call the CG.
 

Slackie

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I do sometime wonder, with engine failure on yachts, what the sails are for!:rolleyes:

As the skipper of the yacht with engine failure ... it had long ceased to be a perfect sailing day - wind died & no prospect of it filling in, no engine, being drifted by the tide across the southern entrance to Southampton Water, from which a container ship & an RFA had just emerged, few other boats around.

So my options were anchoring just outside the main channel till the wind filled (best part of 18 hours as it turned out) or a call to CG on 67 (not Mayday or Pan) to ask whether there were any options on a tow. I was very grateful to the lads on the IRB for a tow on their way back from a shout & the loan of a socket set.

Spending this weekend ordering tools & membership of the RNLI - cause I might need them for what they're really there for one day & wouldn't want them not to be there & trained :)

Nige
 

Searush

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As the skipper of the yacht with engine failure ... it had long ceased to be a perfect sailing day - wind died & no prospect of it filling in, no engine, being drifted by the tide across the southern entrance to Southampton Water, from which a container ship & an RFA had just emerged, few other boats around.

So my options were anchoring just outside the main channel till the wind filled (best part of 18 hours as it turned out) or a call to CG on 67 (not Mayday or Pan) to ask whether there were any options on a tow. I was very grateful to the lads on the IRB for a tow on their way back from a shout & the loan of a socket set.

Spending this weekend ordering tools & membership of the RNLI - cause I might need them for what they're really there for one day & wouldn't want them not to be there & trained :)

Nige

Thanks for the feedback, makes much more sense now. Well done for committing to regular subscription to support RNLI, even if it adds no "service obligation"! :rolleyes:

Don't forget that there is also SeaStart round that area which will be able to offer practical assistance (repair or tow) in a similar situation next time. RNLI are tasked to save lives not boats and may not always choose to tow you back.
 

Ubergeekian

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Indeed. I've been amused by C16 calls from mid-Solent yachts who have suffered engine failure on perfect sailing days.

I was talking recently to a former Oban CG, who remembered getting a distress call from a yacht off Ardnamurchan.

Yacht: We can't start the engine, please send help.
CG: Are you a sailing yacht?
Yacht: Yes, but there is no wind.
CG: Why can't you wait for some?
Yacht: We've arranged to meet friends in the Mishnish at 6.15pm. Please send the lifeboat.
CG: No.
 

Giblets

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As the skipper of the yacht with engine failure ... it had long ceased to be a perfect sailing day - wind died & no prospect of it filling in, no engine, being drifted by the tide across the southern entrance to Southampton Water, from which a container ship & an RFA had just emerged, few other boats around.

So my options were anchoring just outside the main channel till the wind filled (best part of 18 hours as it turned out) or a call to CG on 67 (not Mayday or Pan) to ask whether there were any options on a tow. I was very grateful to the lads on the IRB for a tow on their way back from a shout & the loan of a socket set.

Spending this weekend ordering tools & membership of the RNLI - cause I might need them for what they're really there for one day & wouldn't want them not to be there & trained :)

Nige

Nige, as has been said, thanks for the feedback.

My comment was not specifically directed at your good self and, indeed your position certainly warranted a call/tow. :)

The comment was made in light of having towed a fair number of yachts suffering engine failure during, as Solentboy said, perfect sailing days, back into Pompy. Some even wanted to be towed back up to Port Solent and were a tad miffed when they were dropped off at Haslar.:rolleyes:
 
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