Big batteries

zoidberg

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Musing over the reported launch last week of the giant 120-foot carbon trimaran 'Sodebo' with a professional UK boat-builder, he remarked to me/us that the previous ones didn't last all that well - nor did most of their kind.

"Quite apart from the French penchant for putting them 'base-over-apex', more than few get thrashed to bits before clearing Biscay" he ventured. "Worse than that", he offered, "they start to degrade as soon as they go in the water at Vannes..."

"How's that?" I puzzled.

"Bluddy big batteries, they are! Carbon cloth, acres of it.... immersed in salt water. They start to rot immediately. I'm surprised no-one has told the Sodebo company - and the others."
 

Fantasie 19

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Re. Biscay - "Who Dares Wins" of you want the records you have to pick your window and sometimes mother nature doesn't assist... these boats aren't built to cruise, or to last.. the French build them for one thing and one record, and after that, if they are still good they can be repaired for the next record/challenge, or they rot in some dark corner of Brest/Lorient knowing there job has been done..
 

dunedin

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Hope you are not getting any boat work done by that UK boat builder - seems to have a lot more prejudices than knowledge.

The big French multihulls get a huge amount of punishment - hammering round the world multiple times through the southern oceans at speeds averaging over 30 knots - faster than almost anything else. And in doing so they seem to have a better finish rate than the old slow boats on the Golden Globe Race.
Sure a few tris have been flipped, when being pushed beyond any reasonable limits - often short handed when skipper asleep. But they mostly get righted and repaired (often without calling on external rescue).

And the base hulls sem to have very long life. The big cats from The Race went round the world multiple times, often being modified substantially to try to make that bit faster (and with a name change due to different teams/sponsors). Ditto the big trimarans have tended to have long competitive life.
We watched one of the old The race boats being relaunched at Vannes, after a conversion into a (very) fast cruiser.

Ditto the carbon hulled IMOCA 60's tend to do multiple round the world races at huge speeds.

I think the French builders at Multiplast Vannes, as well as the other French (and most UK) race boat builders know their stuff
 

zoidberg

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Hope you are not getting any boat work done by that UK boat builder - seems to have a lot more prejudices than knowledge.

I think the French builders at Multiplast Vannes, as well as the other French (and most UK) race boat builders know their stuff

I met the fellow at a Plymouth sail loft, where he was lending a hand for an hour and sharing in the banter. And yes, take it from me, he does have a lot of knowledge.
I've been around the block a bit and know how to salt my own banter with just enough 'groundbait' to elicit where a fellah's coming from. He cuts the mustard, all right, but was comfortable among friends and able to grumble in a good-natured way.... ;)

And I certainly agree that the Multiplast 'mechs' are on top of their game. Should I win a King's Ransom on Euromillions, I'd like to go shopping there for a superannuated 50' French trimaran I could trick out with Laura Ashley curtains and bedding, and some Dartington glassware, then go rushing around the Western Channel looking for Festivals.....

Wouldn't you?
 
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