Batteries

Ian_Rob

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Where would I get the best deal on a couple of domestic batteries in the Poole area? The current ones are Exide Dual Marine Multifit FR450’s 95 Ah.

Thankyou
 

vyv_cox

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I bought two leisure batteries for my motorhome from Advanced Battery Supplies in Stockport. Due to my mistake I found when they had been delivered that they were the wrong size, so I took them to Stockport to exchange them. The place looks most unimpressive from outside but inside I found they really know what they are talking about and supply a good product. The batteries have been in use for a couple of years now, still going strong.

They are very competitive on price and delivery was rapid.

Having had sealed batteries on board I would not have them again, open cell types are far more practical, especially with solar panel charging.
 

vyv_cox

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Would you care to give some reasons?

In Greece I add a couple or three litres of deionised water per season to my bank of three x 110Ah. I have no control of the solar panel input to them but with the Sterling alternator controller set on sealed batteries the input max voltage is lower, resulting in much lower levels of battery charge. To overcome this problem I reverted to open cell charge rate on the Sterling but the batteries did not survive as long as I would have expected, presumably because the water boiled(?) off.
 

zoidberg

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That's interesting. I acquired several Optima spiral cell AGM batteries, which I've installed..... believing their merits suggested them optimum for my sailboat purposes. The alternator which came with my Beta 14 engine is 'apparently' not adjustable in output voltage. I now face the problem of getting 14.7V DC into them in order to achieve a full charge while on the mooring.

I'm hoping some flavour of solar controller will do the business. Otherwise, I'm stuck with more visits to a marine 'hook-up' than I'd planned.
 

Graham376

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That's interesting. I acquired several Optima spiral cell AGM batteries, which I've installed..... believing their merits suggested them optimum for my sailboat purposes. The alternator which came with my Beta 14 engine is 'apparently' not adjustable in output voltage. I now face the problem of getting 14.7V DC into them in order to achieve a full charge while on the mooring.

I'm hoping some flavour of solar controller will do the business. Otherwise, I'm stuck with more visits to a marine 'hook-up' than I'd planned.

Look at the Victron Smartsolar, internal bluetooth to tablet or phone allows user to set charging voltages and see history of panel output. Mine is set at 14.85 bulk for Trojans. I agree with Viv, sealed batteries aren't sealed, they're vented with no ability to top up. High charge rates need water adding and my Trojans take about 2l p.a. without an alternator booster.
 

neil1967

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Surely you can use an alternator controller - either the sort that requires you add a wire to the field control of the alternator, or the more advanced (and expensive) Alternator to Battery Charger sold by Sterling. I have an Optima spiral wound battery for starting that is charged from a normal alternator with an add-on controller (and in conjunction with a zero loss splitter), which works very well.
 

Sandy

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I've mentioned this before leisure batteries should be deep cycle such as Trojan all other batteries are for starting the engine.
Really depends on what you are doing; Bluewater cruising or weekend sailing in Lake Solent.

On the last boat my big house battery, 220 Ah had way more CCA than my started battery.

As I am getting my current boat ready for some Bluewater cruising I am fitting some T105s, they are twice the price per amp hour than anything else.
 

dom

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As I am getting my current boat ready for some Bluewater cruising I am fitting some T105s, they are twice the price per amp hour than anything else.

Although based on an anecdotal calc: ultimately half the cost per amp/hr consumed over their life, which in my case compared them to Hankook, Yuasa, and Varta.

BTW, if leaving off-grid for a while, macd is right; you will need a solar or some other regulated charging source with a means of supplying a c.13.7V locked float (depending on temp) with no bulk, absorption, or equalisation cycles, all of which can ultimately result in water loss.
 

Sandy

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+1, but Kelly doesn't do nuances.
T105s can be a pain in the butt if you're away from the boat for months at a time. In common with many lead-antimony batteries their self-discharge rate is just too high to leave them to themselves.

Although based on an anecdotal calc: ultimately half the cost per amp/hr consumed over their life, which in my case compared them to Hankook, Yuasa, and Varta.

BTW, if leaving off-grid for a while, macd is right; you will need a solar or some other regulated charging source with a means of supplying a c.13.7V locked float (depending on temp) with no bulk, absorption, or equalisation cycles, all of which can ultimately result in water loss.
Thanks both.

I'd love to see some proper research on the cost per amp/hr over the working life.

Plans are for pretty constant voyaging once my pension kicks in, occasionally leaving the boat in far off places where a solar panel can keep them topped up.
 

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I agree with Viv, sealed batteries aren't sealed, they're vented with no ability to top up. High charge rates need water adding and my Trojans take about 2l p.a. without an alternator booster.

+2. In fact, I have bought a 'sealed' battery which was identical in every aspect to an earlier, servicable battery other than a label being stuck over the strip which accessed the filling ports. Is there any advantage to preventing topping up of batteries or is sealing a deliberate ploy to shorten battery life.
 

Graham376

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+2. In fact, I have bought a 'sealed' battery which was identical in every aspect to an earlier, servicable battery other than a label being stuck over the strip which accessed the filling ports. Is there any advantage to preventing topping up of batteries or is sealing a deliberate ploy to shorten battery life.

Many years ago I used to deal with a supplier whose batteries came in unmarked cases, he just stuck different labels on depending on customer's requirements. I think most so-called sealed batteries are more of a fit and forget sales ploy than a method to shorten life, as you say they just have flat top fillers with a label stuck over the top. Lets face it though, for the vast majority of boaters who are marina based day and annual holiday sailors, not relying on solar when extended anchoring, there's not much point in spending on Trojans or even more expensive lithium.
 

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