and for my next question

newtoboating

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I have time to do my homework now so in the future (I hope not to distant) I am hoping to become a full time live aboard so I need pointing in the right direction
Firstly type of boat,
I’m not really the sailing type so a motorboat would be my first choice I may consider a motor sailor as later on im hoping to travel more so may keep the fuel cost down
I was looking at the elling but im not sure now if its out of my price range I would like to spend around 150k tops but the cheaper the better so I have been looking at a wide range of boats to get some idea of what I would get I have seen some around that look a good buy at around the 80k mark or am I expecting to much for the money
I like the idea of steel (nice and strong) displacement or semi would do fine as most of my cursing would be coastal or rivers etc the elling is a good alternative as the hull is nice and strong but failing that grp
What are your thoughts?
As a live-aboard fuel economy is a consideration so is a single diesel the best idea?
Are twins really that expensive to run?
One other thing that I must throw in is heating what should I be looking for?
I would like to keep warm as I can see me starting off in the UK waters due to work commitments and although my only boating experience was on a small and old cabin cruiser it suffered terrible condensation especially in the mornings
Any advice there would be appreciated
Many thanks
 

nathanlee

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I know nothing about motorboats, but 80k would get you a bloody nice sailing boat.

Just a quick note re motorboats, be aware of the fuel. A guy I know has a 43footer and it costs him £2,000 to get over to France and back from the east coast.

Another thing... don't plan too much until you are able to do it, otherwise it just turns into a day dream. I don't want to dissuade you, but I've been there and done it. It's far too easy to think "I could get an 80k loan, and then..." or "I could sell my house, and then..." all very well and good, but the reality is you'll be very hard pressed to get the loan, and nobody is buying houses.

Believe me, it's best to get the cash first, or, set your sights a bit lower so you almost have it all already. You will find the last little bit when you find the right boat, much easier than you think /forums/images/graemlins/smile.gif

Depending on the size of the boat, you will have a few heating options. I wouldn't worry too much about that until you've chosen, or at least narrowed down to, a specific boat.

Oh, also, apparently steel hulls will cost you a packet in maintenance, although I have no experience thereof.
 

Rabbit

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Hi there,
Steel is the way to go.
Motor Or Sail.

Easy to fix.

Rivit or weld.

Most people can do both. Or know a man that can.

No reason that it should not last forever.
Ticks all the boxes.

kind regards,
Les.
 

Squeaky

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Good evening:

I strongly suggest you look for a GRP motor sailor as there is nothing to stop you from using it as a "motor boat" - just put up the main sail and sheet it in hard to stop the rolling and away you go. Once you gain more confidence you can even play with the sails and find that it is not too difficult even for a novice.

Motor boats are horrendously expensive to run - a neighbour with a 35 plus foot MV can't afford to travel as it consumes something like 20 litres an hour for which he gets a grand total of 12 miles.

There are thousands of GRP sailing yachts on the market and I suggest you start looking around to get a feel of what is available. Try to get on board and just sit there and absorb the atmosphere remembering what now feels horrendously cramped will soon seem normal especially if you move from a large house as I did - from a three story house to a 27 ft yacht.

I know that people who have steel hulled yachts wax poetical about them but almost every steel yacht I have seen is covered in rust including the one across the pontoon. I note your comment that steel is "strong". "Strong" only comes into consideration when you hit something or are hit which is what you are supposed to avoid.

Check around to see how many GRP yachts have been sunk by hitting something - suspect there numbers will be very low annually.

Good luck - I remember the days when I was in your position - it was a very confusing time with a lot of well meaning advice but I eventually found that many people were trying to convince me to follow their path as they were trying to justify their wisdom in having purchased what they did.

Cheers

Squeaky
 

newtoboating

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Hi
Thank you “Nathanlee” for you comments
I do take on board your comments as I say im not really a sailing kind of guy but I may be persuaded if fuel was a big problem but by what I understand you tend to get more room in a motor boat rather than a sailing boat?
And im not making any plans just yet just doing a bit of thinking aloud.
Is steel really that much maintenance?
The cash would be coming from the sale of our house but I have more than enough in the property to cover things and I hopefully wanted to do it with some cash in the bank?.
Anyway due to the market im not selling at the moment this will be a future thing
Thanks anyway
Any more comments on hull material?
 

newtoboating

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Thank you Squeaky for your input
I was sort of thinking about motor sailors the only thing that bothers me is that I would like to explore the river/canal system to some existent so it just may be a little restrictive but I do need to find out more about where I can take it.
It sounds like you made a bold move coming from a tree story house I only live in a modest 3 bed bungalow and its full of crap accumulated over the years I cant wait for the day I have that big skip delivered.
 

LadyJessie

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You should search this forum; it already has a lot of information on this particular subject. There was a very similar question to yours very recently and the boat recommended was a Troll 69. I think this boat would also suit your circumstances the best. Please check it out.
 

hlb

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You can still have a twin engined mobo. But the trick will be, switching one engine off, then getting the other down to 4 knots. To save fuel. Nothing difficult about this. Trouble is, a 20 knot boat stays upright for one reason and a four knot boat, for quite another. In calm weather, we have often toddled back from the chanel ilses on one engine for a while, while eating lunch and leavig the auto pilot to it for an hour or two. At the end of the day, we have usually had an easy trip and the joint in the oven, from an hour or two out.

In short, you dont have to use lots of juice, because you have two engines, but you probably will.
 

newtoboating

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I have read something about this before you can run on one engine but as I understand it you should swap over half way so as to give both engines equal running hours?
And am I right in thinking what your saying is a twin-engine planing boat running slower will roll around more than a slower displacement boat?
I’m not bothered about getting any ware fast so a displacement with one engine would do me fine or is there any advantages with having two engines?
Apart from if a single engine boat has a breakdown.
That said is it an easy thing on any boat to have an auxiliary engine?
 
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