Anchor cable - rejoining

ponapay

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Can anyone reccommend a good (strong) way of joining cable.

I have 80 fathoms of 5/16 calibrated cable, the last 20 fathoms are dreadful. I turned the cable every year for six years and forgot last year and on attempting the same this year found that I had a ball of almost inseparable cable for the last 20 fathoms.

I now want to cut the bad stuff off and add new 5/16".

Any ideas? And will I be able to get 5/16" or have to dicth the lost a get a new gypsy too.
 

colvic987

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Just cut the 20 fathoms off, you surely dont need 80 fathoms of chain do you, (147 metres of chain).

The weight you save will make your boat sail a lot faster..

you can add the difference with some anchor warp, it will save on the weight also...
 

cliff

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Have it welded - professionally!
--------------------
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"Artificial intelligence is no match for natural stupidity"
sailroom <span style="color:red">The place to auction your previously loved boatie bits</span>
 

colvic987

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The container is a good idea, i have made a teak grid which allows the water to drain away from the chain, allowing it to dry naturally and not sit in a puddle of corrosive water...
 

hylass

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[ QUOTE ]
<span style="color:blue"> Have it welded - professionally!
</span>

[/ QUOTE ]

Absolutely not.. as, even welded by a "professional", you don't have any waranty that the mecanical characteristics will be kept..

And I fully agree with the comments from colvic987
[ QUOTE ]
Just cut the 20 fathoms off, you surely don’t need 80 fathoms of chain, (147 metres of chain)…

[/ QUOTE ]

And then cut the remaining chain in two, keep one half in your garage as a spare, and splice some elastic ROPE at the end of the part you will use on your boat.

As I always say. A good anchor rode MUST have some elasticity, which is by no means given by the chain..

Safe anchoring..
Alain
 

steveallan

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Use two galvanised 'D' shackles, the largest you can find where the pins go through the chain. Apply some waterproof grease to the threads and mouse the pins with monel wire or gavanised wire.

Steve

Steve
 

GMac

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[ QUOTE ]
Absolutely not.. as, even welded by a "professional", you don't have any waranty that the mecanical characteristics will be kept..

[/ QUOTE ]

What a strange thing to say Alain. Each and every link has already been welded by a machine and you think those are smarter than a good professional welder?

I would have thought a good welder would have been fine. There is a crowd in Tunisia that welded up anchors and those seem OK, ring them /forums/images/graemlins/smile.gif

Actually we have a welder bloke with tickets as long as your arm. He has welded chain together for us in the passed. Some of these were going into Class boats as well so we always do a few extra and test them for Lloyds, BV, GL and the rest. Never had any load problems. The only downside is the lack of galvanising on that link and the 2 next to it. Lots of cold galv seems to work OK.
 

vyv_cox

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C-links are a minefield. Your average chandlery ones are about half the strength of the chain if you are lucky. You can buy coded links for professional use, e.g. Crosby, Acco and others and these are pretty much the strength of the chain. I recommend Selby Engineering and Lifting Safety in Leeds, 01977 684600 www.liftingsafety.co.uk

Only buy links that are marked up with their load rating, these will be heat treated and therefore quite difficult to peen the rivets over. If it is easy to peen the rivets thay are annealed, typical of the ones bought in chandleries, which indicates to you that they have a lower capability of carrying load. Some of these are very badly made, of dubious materials, and can fail at as little as a quarter of the chain strength.
 

hylass

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[ QUOTE ]
Each and every link has already been welded by a machine and you think those are smarter than a good professional welder?


[/ QUOTE ]

Hi GMac,

As a specialist of chain, you perfectly know the technic used by the machine to weld each link,

Yes, a good professional can make a very strong weld.. but as I pointed out, what warranty will you have that the "professional" was good and did a good job??

You just have to blind trust him..

And by the different exchanges we already had, you know perfectly that I don't like ANY means of joining two chains.
 

ponapay

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Have now reviewed various options and made a decision.

Many thanks for all your suggestions. My solutions.

1 Have had the cable inspected and found rust not all that bad, it just seemed so. Asked galvansising company to quote for re-galvanising whole cable; cost greater than buying replacment cable (of slightly less length).

2 Have also inspected windlass (it has given a number of problems in recent years, all to do with wiring getting damp from condensation).

3 Will buy new cable and windlass from supplier. Therefore not restricted to 5/16" and may go to 9.5mm.

Thanks all round.
 

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