Ais newbie

Teko

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So this will be pretty simple for most of you. I'd like to install ais on board so the boat could be seen on marine traffic and of course by other yachts.

Where do I start?
 

LadyInBed

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You will need a Transceiver - more expensive than Receiver only which doesn't show on Marine Traffic.
If you want to connect it to a Tablet chart plotter app you will need WiFi option. There are other ways to connect to a tablet but more hardware is required.
If you are connecting to a Chart Plotter things are quite straightforward.
You can also get AIS units with their own built in screen if you want to keep it standalone.
The AIS will need an antenna, either built into the AIS unit, combined with your VHF or seperate.
That's your starter, others will add more . . .
 

johnalison

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If class B AIS is on your shopping list, you might be wanting to spend money to combine it with a chart-plotter, and if so, you might want a MFD to unite with a range of instruments, and, what the hell, why not a radar as well. It all depends on what you expect from your system. I would say that Class B, or even receive only, is only really worth forking out on if you are going into open sea sailing, such as the English Channel. There are several ways of proceeding, as above, and all should work, even sharing the VHF aerial with a splitter, which is what I do.

At the end of the day, you will need to remember that your other half and every Tom, Dick and Harry will know where you are!
 

BobnLesley

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As already noted, if you want to be seen rather than just see you'll need to fit a transceiver and if you're wanting a freestanding unit, then we've been impressed with our very reasonably priced Matsutec unit. It was about £350, plus another fifty for a vhf antenna/cable which is just mounted on the goalposts at the stern, but we're apparently transmitting 20+ miles and receiving from even further. The only disappointment is that the GPS unit from it won't 'talk' to our NASA Repeater, though strangely it'll talk to the much older NASA unit that we carry as a spare; I suspect that's a problem at the NASA end of things rather than with the Matsutec AIS unit.
 

winsbury

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AIS is fabulous on long trips or away from the madding crowd but a positive nightmare in the Solent with so many boats transmitting the collision alarm just keeps going off. That said, in the fog and combined with a decent radar it is very comforting, I wouldn't be without one now.

a Transceiver gives 'see' and 'be seen' functionality, you need to decide where the screen will be to view the info, either a built in one or via your plotter/pc/mfd. To transmit it MUST have your position so needs a GPS feed, some models have this built in. Also you need an antenna, it can be a dedicated one but you can also use a special active splitter that uses the existing VHF antenna, these seem expensive but save complexity and a trip up the mast and more cabling to install another twig.
 

pvb

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To transmit it MUST have your position so needs a GPS feed, some models have this built in.

All transceivers have their own GPS, it's part of the standard governing their use. Your post demonstrates the general lack of understanding of AIS equipment.
 
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BelleSerene

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AIS is fabulous on long trips or away from the madding crowd but a positive nightmare in the Solent with so many boats transmitting the collision alarm just keeps going off.

I wonder if you also find a burglar alarm a positive nightmare as it keeps going off while you’re at home. Perhaps you’d be better without those lights in the ceiling too, so you can sleep in the dark?

Turn your proximity alarm off when you don’t want to be alerted. Doesn’t affect the utility of seeing where and who the big blobs in the water are.
 

Gargleblaster

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As already noted, if you want to be seen rather than just see you'll need to fit a transceiver and if you're wanting a freestanding unit, then we've been impressed with our very reasonably priced Matsutec unit. It was about £350, plus another fifty for a vhf antenna/cable which is just mounted on the goalposts at the stern, but we're apparently transmitting 20+ miles and receiving from even further. The only disappointment is that the GPS unit from it won't 'talk' to our NASA Repeater, though strangely it'll talk to the much older NASA unit that we carry as a spare; I suspect that's a problem at the NASA end of things rather than with the Matsutec AIS unit.

I notice your location is floating west in the Pacific, which means in my mind ocean sailing so power consumption of your electronics are probably important to you. I currently have an AIS receiver built into my VHF, which I turn on every couple of hours to save power, to see if there is anything within 50 miles. How much poser does the Matsutec use? I have been considering a Matsutec transponder with its own screen but can find no information on its power consumption. I used a Vesper crossing the Pacific a few years ago as it shut itself down to just the signal output and receive function and the power use was negligible. But the Vesper is two and a half times the price of a Matsutec.
 
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