Air con

PabloPicasso

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I've been reading that thread about med-ising a boat. But has anyone thought of fitting car style air con with a compressor run directly off an engine?

Any reason it wouldn't work?
 

prv

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Only that the main time you want aircon is hot sticky nights when you're trying to sleep, and running an engine is neither going to help with that nor make you popular with your neighbours :)

Pete
 

PabloPicasso

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What about a small quiet engine like those 'whispering' Honda generators?
 

30boat

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You can do as I did when I lived in Macau.When the humidity and heat became unbearable I'd soak myself from head to toe and go back to bed.It worked....
 

Tranona

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What about a small quiet engine like those 'whispering' Honda generators?

Whispering is relative. Plenty of threads on here about using these on yachts as substitutes from proper generators. They are noisy, have to be run outside, use petrol, have limited output. Useful for occasional use to power tools or charge batteries but not for anything permanent. AC possible using proper dedicated systems with plumbed in generators, but use lots of space so only really practical on boats of 45'+. Smaller boats in US have it fitted but lose a lot of accommodation space. So most people going to the Med don't bother - not worth the cost, complexity and loss of space.
 

duncan99210

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If you're going to warmer climes and therefore consider that aircon is an essential, then I'd think again. Rather than trying to cool the inside of the boat down to UK temperatures, I'd focus on ensuring good ventilation, possibly fans to aid air circulation but most importantly letting yourself adjust to the higher temperatures. Anchor off so you can swim to cool down, learn to do things in the cooler parts of the day, rest during the heat of the afternoon, ensure that there's plenty of shade on the boat and so on. That way you'll adapt to the heat, save a shed load of money you'd otherwise spend on fuel and discover a whole new world under the water if you invest in a snorkel and mask for your swimming.....
 

prv

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If you're going to warmer climes and therefore consider that aircon is an essential, then I'd think again.

That's what I tend to think too. Can't comment on truly tropical places, but we used to charter in the Med in high summer every year and I never found myself wishing for aircon. The idea of sealing up your boat and skulking below seems incongruous, and will only make it seem hotter when you do emerge. A wind-scoop for the forehatch and a 12v fan over each occupied bunk is all that's needed.

Pete
 

Ric

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I've been reading that thread about med-ising a boat. But has anyone thought of fitting car style air con with a compressor run directly off an engine?

Any reason it wouldn't work?

Don't bother. In fifteen years of cruising around the Med, I have only felt the need for air-con (while at anchor) on one occasion in the Balearics. I have just come back from a mini-cruise around the Porquerolle Islands amongst record temperatures, and I certainly never felt any need for air-con.

It can get hotter and unpleasant in ports. Some boats (usually motorists) have aircon working off shore power - but even that is pretty annoying for neighbours as there is a continual pouring of water from the cooling system.
 

macd

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The idea of sealing up your boat and skulking below seems incongruous

Couldn't agree more. We were invited for drinks on board a Dutch boat a few weeks ago, and were surprised to be ushered below. Yes, the cool was pleasant, as was the company, but lurking in a saloon with nothing to see seemed a little perverse. Besides, how are you going to relate to the 'Why can't people anchor' thread if you can't see what's going on? ;)
(And I've already got quite enough 'systems' to give me grief.)
 

cmedsailor

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I'd focus on ensuring good ventilation, possibly fans to aid air circulation but most importantly letting yourself adjust to the higher temperatures. Anchor off so you can swim to cool down, learn to do things in the cooler parts of the day, rest during the heat of the afternoon, ensure that there's plenty of shade on the boat and so on. That way you'll adapt to the heat, save a shed load of money you'd otherwise spend on fuel and discover a whole new world under the water if you invest in a snorkel and mask for your swimming.....

Fully agree. And I live in the Med. The only place an aircondition is sometimes "necessary" is probably in the marina. But over there with plenty of electricity (shore power) you can also run your domestic big and quite fans.
 

Avocet

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On a slightly different tack, there's a European Directive on "Mobile Air Conditioning Systems" which I think such a system might fall under. I know it would be difficult to police, but technically, I think a DIY system would fall within its scope.
 

KellysEye

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We bought a 240 volt AC unit in the Caribbean and plugged it to shore power in marinas which are hottest places. You will notice hot air goes in the top vent and cool out the bottom vent. So tape some cardboard between the vents and bend it 90 degrees to fit precisely the width of the middle of the hatch of the hatch and hanging down below the the level of the hatch by 14 inches. This ensures you get all the cool air. If the supply is 110 volts then buy a 110 volt shore side plug and it can be rewired to deliver240 volts, but get a pro to do it, we that did in the American islands.
 
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