73 year old woman dropped into freezing seas

soreknees

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just read on the BBC website that the lady in question has died in Carlisle hospital. Makes the cost of that port call seem rather trivial now
 

Seajet

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Well, I for one was making jokes about procedures etc and rather forgetting what my first reaction was when I heard about this, that the poor lady in question, already ill, would be lucky to survive this.

It's just been on the radio that Mrs Janet Richardson has sadly died in hospital; naturally no word on whether this incident contributed, one thing's for sure it didn't help.
 
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Lakesailor

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It said in the (Daily Mail) report I linked to that they had discounted using a helicopter.
She was already a medical emergency with internal bleeding before the accident.
I can't think that helped her condition at all.

Even if the cruise ship crew thought it was an OK procedure I can't imagine the Rescue Boat crew were happy with it.
Were they passing the stretcher out of a waterline-opening door?

Anyone notice what is on the lifeboat?

Lifeboat
 
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Seajet

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Why was the helo discounted ? Cost, as seems the case with ' 2NM is too far to divert' ?

I suppose one thinks a transfer is fine, forgetting this can happen, but it all surely causes discomfort & stress - a quick helo trip direct to hospital seems a good idea - yes, especially with 20/20 hindsight.
 
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.... Anyone notice what is on the lifeboat?

Lifeboat

Not enough room to swing a cat, never mind manipulate a heavy, awkward stretcher whose ends are at different elevations, and requires and right angle turn to clear the side deck of the evacuation vessel.

It all appears to be rather ill conceived and if it was all just to save money, I would agree that that some one needs to answer for this.
 

Seajet

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It seems pretty obvious this Pilot Launch must have been out already, and called to carry out this 'Medivac'.

No doubt measures will be put in place and routines quietly changed,( quietly or it looks like an admission of failings, I've seen this in another but equally tragic way myself, after an accident and a lot of changes were made to equipment, all my photo's were seized and put in a company safe ) but I doubt changes now or anything else will make Mr.Richardson feel any better.

I've always been surprised that even very large cruise ships rarely have a really good sick bay, despite the guests tending towards the elderly side; and I'm not just saying it because of this incident, I do think that if they can afford all the fripperies modern cruise ships boast, they should afford a helicopter.
 

JayBee

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I've always been surprised that even very large cruise ships rarely have a really good sick bay, despite the guests tending towards the elderly side...

I don't know how many cruises you have been on recently, and I haven't been on a commercial one for a long time, but a quick google for "cruise ship medical facilities" produced a contrary opinion:

QUOTE
All cruise ships have some kind of medical facility onboard to treat mostly nonserious maladies, from broken bones and seasickness to sun overexposure and respiratory ailments. Indeed, as cruise ships have grown in size, many have invested seriously in creating medical facilities that could (almost) rival those on land. On NCL ships, for instance, the line says that its onboard facilities are equipped to handle everything "from thrombolyic therapy to X-ray." Some Holland America ships have digital radiology capabilities that enable doctors to send X-rays to the University of Texas Medical Branch, the company's land partner, in extremely complicated situations.

And, just as equipment and facilities have evolved, so too has medical care itself. Those cruise lines that are part of Cruise Lines International Association -- which includes all of the majors -- agree to follow healthcare guidelines, based on requirements set by the American College of Emergency Physicians (ACEP).

Still, there are some illnesses that, in most cases, cruise ships won't treat -- serious heart problems and strokes are right up there
. UNQUOTE
 

Seajet

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Still, there are some illnesses that, in most cases, cruise ships won't treat -- serious heart problems and strokes are right up there.

As in, the most likely serious problems with the guests in question !

Just as with helicopters, if you're going to have a couple of thousand guests largely biased towards above middle age, take them to sea and make a profit out of them with casinos and shows and any attraction possible while charging handsome fees, a sick bay with more than a token Doctor and minor injuries capability seems a reasonable thing to ask.
 

Jamesuk

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I recall watching a 1993 video about the ARC where a women suffering from severe sea sickness was transferred by two ropes from one yacht to another "in the water"! I thought at the time she really must have been hated for her not to have been put in an inflatable dinghy. :) Get in the water and F'off.

Let us wait to here what Frankie Boyle says about the incident off of Norway.

As for my opinion - Accident that's it, now move on.
 

NorthUp

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It's not a lifeboat, it's a pilot cutter, the clue is in the H flag. Designed for pilot transfer, not medivacs from cruise ships.

Pilot boat crews have also been known to do a little fishing between jobs.



From the Daily Wail link in post 2- multitasking SAR vessel? International CG colour scheme?
 
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billmacfarlane

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A British grandmother has been dropped into the freezing North Sea during a bungled rescue mission to remove her from a cruise ship.

She was aboard the Ocean Princess cruise ship on a tour of Norway when she fell ill and had be transported to a Norwegian hospital.

While the rescue team was moving her on a stretcher to the rescue boat she fell into the sea — which was about -3C. It took rescuers eight minutes before she was retrieved from the water. :eek:

Just when you thought your day couldn't get any worse. Poorly on holiday, then dropped into the sea, strapped to a stretcher. :eek:

How awful, I do hope the lady makes a swift and full recovery.
Sadly she died last night.
 

JayBee

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From the Daily Wail link in post 2- multitasking SAR vessel? International CG colour scheme?

Whatever the colour scheme, it is optimised for pilot transfer and would have been in pilotage service at the time, hence the H flag. Other details include the pilots' elevated platform and handrails on each shoulder of the boat, clearly seen on the starboard side, plus the typical heavy duty fendering along the topsides.

These features are better seen in a short video of a similar boat:

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=qbc3hNoBXDc

Pilot boats are more or less continually at sea in busy port approaches and are frequently on scene and rendering assistance at casualties near their stations, before the lifeboat arrives. This seems to have been given some recognition in the SAR logo on the Norwegian boat and possibly reflects the way in which the boat is funded.
 
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