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Will British Registered Boats already in Europe command a premium in 2021

Star-Lord

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Cagliari, Sardinia.
Yep, if you're a UK citizen with no EU citizenship that would work - it's what the US cruisers I've met in the Med are doing. The value of the boat when you decide to sell would be reduced as it was never officially imported to the EU or UK, and if you ever decided to bring it to the UK then there will be all the import hoops to jump through - but this will all be offset by the attractive original purchase price hopefully. (y) .... kitting out a boat for a transat where the boat is in the US, and converting all the AC gear to EU voltages won't be cheap. Maybe buy and cruise in the US before heading to Europe to give yourself time to sort out the boat first. Could be a viable plan.
All very interesting. Yes forgot about all the electrics and stuff!
 

Graham376

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15 Apr 2018
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Boat on Mooring off Faro, Home near Abergele
Yep, if you're a UK citizen with no EU citizenship that would work - it's what the US cruisers I've met in the Med are doing. The value of the boat when you decide to sell would be reduced as it was never officially imported to the EU or UK, and if you ever decided to bring it to the UK then there will be all the
What you have said can work well for anyone who doesn't have residence in the EU, but those who have are not entitled to have a VAT unpaid boat. Without residence, there is of course the 90/180 day rule - how do non EU citizens handle that?
 

Star-Lord

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25 Jan 2020
Messages
911
Location
Cagliari, Sardinia.
What you have said can work well for anyone who doesn't have residence in the EU, but those who have are not entitled to have a VAT unpaid boat. Without residence, there is of course the 90/180 day rule - how do non EU citizens handle that?
You can apply for visa and get extra days My American neighbour did that very easily. Maybe some places more relaxed than others. I still think it may be a mistake applying for residency if you are able to pop over to non EU ports to reset clock. Portugal for example could change their mind about 'foreign boats / residency / time of day / and freeze your banks accounts and seize your boat and there will be not much you can do - Portugal and Spain play by their own rules. And I suppose so do the rest of Europe. I think it best to remain British and move when required.

My plan at the moment is to stay around Mallorca and Sardinia with hops to Tunisia to escape. If you arrive at anchor in EU you may get a few days or weeks or months extra if you choose anchorages that are busy and rarely frequented by officials. And there are quite a few of those in the Med.
 

Baggywrinkle

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6 Mar 2010
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7,463
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Ammersee, Bavaria
What you have said can work well for anyone who doesn't have residence in the EU, but those who have are not entitled to have a VAT unpaid boat. Without residence, there is of course the 90/180 day rule - how do non EU citizens handle that?
True, resident in the EU and VAT is due, but non-EU residents - UK residents - can leave their boat happily in the EU under temporary import (no VAT or import duty), abide by the 90/180 rule when visiting and move the boat in and out every 18 months and it will work out fine. This works for people who holiday on their boat each summer, but for UK residents planning elongated stays it will just require a bit more planning. Aussies and Americans I've met in the med seem to cope - but there is the added pressure not to overstay the 90 days or the 18 months. There was an Australian I met in my marina who cracked his mast and needed to order a replacement - it happened close to his 18 month import deadline so it was all a bit stressful trying to get the boat fixed in order to check in and out and reset the clock.
 

Baggywrinkle

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6 Mar 2010
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Ammersee, Bavaria
You can apply for visa and get extra days My American neighbour did that very easily. Maybe some places more relaxed than others. I still think it may be a mistake applying for residency if you are able to pop over to non EU ports to reset clock. Portugal for example could change their mind about 'foreign boats / residency / time of day / and freeze your banks accounts and seize your boat and there will be not much you can do - Portugal and Spain play by their own rules. And I suppose so do the rest of Europe. I think it best to remain British and move when required.

My plan at the moment is to stay around Mallorca and Sardinia with hops to Tunisia to escape. If you arrive at anchor in EU you may get a few days or weeks or months extra if you choose anchorages that are busy and rarely frequented by officials. And there are quite a few of those in the Med.
If you are caught anchored or in a port without having checked in via customs/police first then they will throw the book at you so be careful. You will be treated no differently to a drug smuggler, people trafficker or bogus asylum seeker - and you have assets to sieze. Imagine what the UK border force would do if they caught a foreign yacht in UK waters flying under the radar and attempting to avoid customs and immigration. It's ultimately your risk, but you could end up with your boat impounded and lengthy court proceedings in a foreign country if you flout the rules.
 

Star-Lord

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Joined
25 Jan 2020
Messages
911
Location
Cagliari, Sardinia.
If you are caught anchored or in a port without having checked in via customs/police first then they will throw the book at you so be careful. You will be treated no differently to a drug smuggler, people trafficker or bogus asylum seeker - and you have assets to sieze. Imagine what the UK border force would do if they caught a foreign yacht in UK waters flying under the radar and attempting to avoid customs and immigration. It's ultimately your risk, but you could end up with your boat impounded and lengthy court proceedings in a foreign country if you flout the rules.
Yes, was not thinking about having to check in after Jan 1st 2020.
 

Graham376

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15 Apr 2018
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3,645
Location
Boat on Mooring off Faro, Home near Abergele
You can apply for visa and get extra days My American neighbour did that very easily. Maybe some places more relaxed than others. I still think it may be a mistake applying for residency if you are able to pop over to non EU ports to reset clock. Portugal for example could change their mind about 'foreign boats / residency / time of day / and freeze your banks accounts and seize your boat and there will be not much you can do - Portugal and Spain play by their own rules. And I suppose so do the rest of Europe. I think it best to remain British and move when required.
Don't know where you get that idea. I've had permanent residence in Portugal for quite a few years and my wife is a citizen. While they my alter the rules for new resident applications, it's so unlikely they would change their minds about those already established there, it isn't worth considering.
 

Star-Lord

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25 Jan 2020
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911
Location
Cagliari, Sardinia.
I think the main reason I did not get Portuguese residency is because Portugal has a history of playing by their own rules. Everything is so relaxed and so many people taking the piss there at the moment - and it has been like that for a long time. It is like they are giving you the rope to hang yourself. Portugal is too good to be true.

I know of one ordinary legitimate Portuguese business who were put under surveillance (telephone tap) and who had bank accounts frozen for a minor infringement. Everything was cleared up and there was a small fine but they are ready and waiting imo to take it to the next level. Portugal charges people to use motorway that was paid for by EU - this is not allowed? New cars taxed extortionately and illegally and Portugal pays the EU fine every year because the fine is less than their profit. Corruption in 'Big' business is standard ( i suspect small business is ignored for now).

Obviously everyone remembers Cyprus banking fiasco. I believe Portugal may not be the ideal spot for high net worth individuals as it likes to portray. Lots of tax breaks and advantages that can be withdrawn in an instant. If you are a mobile yacht with no property it should be of no concern. Obviously this is pure conjecture but Portugal and Spain will turn on non-natives first when it goes tits up. I believe the next decade will be interesting.

I believe this of every country in Europe btw. If you are a foreign 'resident' you basically have less rights than back home and certainly less rights than a native.
 

Graham376

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Joined
15 Apr 2018
Messages
3,645
Location
Boat on Mooring off Faro, Home near Abergele
If you are caught anchored or in a port without having checked in via customs/police first then they will throw the book at you so be careful. You will be treated no differently to a drug smuggler, people trafficker or bogus asylum seeker - and you have assets to sieze. Imagine what the UK border force would do if they caught a foreign yacht in UK waters flying under the radar and attempting to avoid customs and immigration. It's ultimately your risk, but you could end up with your boat impounded and lengthy court proceedings in a foreign country if you flout the rules.
Met a Dutch couple a few years ago in Spain, they had overstayed their welcome, took up residence and then had to Pay €7,500 to matriculate the boat they hadn't declared.
 

Resolution

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16 Feb 2006
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3,216
The U.S. has some great value boats imo that are very hard to find in Europe. Like Tartan and Sabre.
A rare and welcome mention of Sabre. (The quality US brand made in Maine, not to be confused with the economy UK brand). My boat, "Resolution", is a Sabre 42 specially made in the USA for export to the UK. Electrics, gas bottle storage, etc etc had to be changed. Lovely attractive boat. Will be coming up for sale in a year or two due to age of owner and his mates.
 

Star-Lord

Active member
Joined
25 Jan 2020
Messages
911
Location
Cagliari, Sardinia.
A rare and welcome mention of Sabre. (The quality US brand made in Maine, not to be confused with the economy UK brand). My boat, "Resolution", is a Sabre 42 specially made in the USA for export to the UK. Electrics, gas bottle storage, etc etc had to be changed. Lovely attractive boat. Will be coming up for sale in a year or two due to age of owner and his mates.
What year?
 
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