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Vouliagmeni bay Greece Anchoring forbidden

OldBawley

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9 Aug 2010
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Just so you know, Vouliagmeni bay is now closed for anchoring yachts. Two weeks ago no problem, now the coastguard came sounding their thingy, then the guy speaking a bit of English asked where I came from. I pointed to my flag, and said Belgium because they don't see the difference between a Belgian, German or Roumenian flag.

He then said “you have to leave, you can anchor behind the English yacht. “

No reason was given, even when I asked, he was very rude, said “You have 10 minutes “

All yachts had to leave, some big mobo´s as well.

The English yacht he was referring to was a huge sailing yacht practically lying outside.

I was anchored 50 meters from the swimming boys and at least 5 high powered professional wave boats ware pulling waterskiers and floating toys trough the water. They skip between the windsurf boards and small sailing boats that are for rent at the beach.

Just before the coastguard came, a member of the small boat club / harbour where I was anchored close to came congratulating me for the boat. He said nothing about closed for anchoring.

I have been anchoring in Vouliagmeni since 2001, never a problem. One good fish restaurant there.

Two weeks ago I anchored behind the Vouliagmeni marina as I had done for years, was summoned by the coastguard in the marina to go to the spot I was in today.

Anyone know why or wha
 

SpiderMoobs

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A stray dog & a drunken sailor
Head for the fish restaurant and tell them you won't be eating there again because of the new anchoring restrictions. I wouldn't be surprised if words are exchanged between the locals. Job done!
 

OldBawley

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The very same restaurant has in its online page “ Sardelaki me Thea is where you can order baked sardines or grilled scorpion fish while gazing at the yachts in Vouliagmeni bay. “



I left. Dont like to be handled rude.
 

OldBawley

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I use the cm93 charts and the Elias guide. Last one is bought in 2001 so could be incorrect.

No anchor restrictions their. The cm 93 charts are old also.

I mentioned this because many people use this bay to collect crew from the airport. Bus 96 passes close by.

Those ski boats especially made for making waves now have a new trick. They go slow, creating an even bigger wave on which a surfboard with fin can wave ride. Also on board : four huge boom boxes making noise that the driver is proud of. Sort of statement of his lack of intelligence and age.

Old guy with abba.

I will have look into the navionics charts, that would explain why the coastguard did not want to give a reason.
 

OldBawley

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Had a look into navionics and yes, all anchoring prohibited. Also had a better look at my old cm93 maps and their it says “ Restricted area, catrea 2 “ It was always full of yachts, never paid any attention on the map.

So, I was just plain stupid. Mea culpa.

Btw, patrol boat of coastguard with 6 guys in it, all without a mask. But they stayed at a safe distance.



As to protection of bathers and pollution, An anchored sailing yacht ( who sailed in and out ) is a lot less dangerous than speeding wave making powerboats who pull people trough the water.



Nevertheless, I wont be going there any more. Follow the rules.
 

Tony Cross

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It's my understanding that under Greek law it is forbidden to anchor within 1000m of a swimming beach. This is of course very rarely enforced but if someone on the beach complains the coastguard are duty bound to act and move you on.
 

sailaboutvic

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It's my understanding that under Greek law it is forbidden to anchor within 1000m of a swimming beach. This is of course very rarely enforced but if someone on the beach complains the coastguard are duty bound to act and move you on.
You sure it's a 1000 M ? I tho it's 1000 miles and only after you paid the tax :)
 

OldBawley

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It's my understanding that under Greek law it is forbidden to anchor within 1000m of a swimming beach. This is of course very rarely enforced but if someone on the beach complains the coastguard are duty bound to act and move you on.
In that case, anchoring is forbidden everywhere in Greece.



I once had a dispute with the boss of the Coastguard on Chalki. In a bay SW of Chalki town new swimming buoys had been laid. The taverna owner on the beach had them layed just on the border of the usable bay. So you could not anchor in sand as before, now had to anchor in between car sized rock boulders. As you know, that is quite dangerous. Also, fast speed boats ware coming and going all the time to the taverna and they are the ones endangering swimmers. They kill each year. Anchored yachts are in fact lifesaving for some swimmers. ( I have saved two on Rhodos )

I asked the Coastguard chief who decided where those boys came, and why, and he said “I do, and I dont need to give you a reason “ Meaning he could not.

Next day the problem was solved because all boys ware gone and a pile of molten yellow plastic lay on the beach. Dont know how the situation is now, I am talking long time ago.

That was the same guy who sent a female Coastguard to us on the floating pontoon in the main harbour to demand that we anchor and go stern to the floating pontoon. I said to the lady “It is 20 meters deep just off the pontoon, we dont carry 300 meters of chain. Real reason is that it is full of chains to hold the floating pontoon, good chance to loose your anchor. (And to give the diver a good days earning) On top of that there ware 6 yachts alongside the pontoon, one of them even lived there, and we ware the only ones who had to go stern to.

So up I went to the Coastguard office and asked why we and not the others had to move.

His answer: The others are not there, so we can not ask them. I told him that was because the others hid inside as soon as they saw someone coming. Bet they did not even pay.

So I stayed two more days and hid when the lady was spotted. Did not move the boat, that was impossible because I was not there.
 

nortada

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Summer Walton, Winter Iberia
In that case, anchoring is forbidden everywhere in Greece.

I once had a dispute with the boss of the Coastguard on Chalki. In a bay SW of Chalki town new swimming buoys had been laid. The taverna owner on the beach had them layed just on the border of the usable bay. So you could not anchor in sand as before, now had to anchor in between car sized rock boulders. As you know, that is quite dangerous. Also, fast speed boats ware coming and going all the time to the taverna and they are the ones endangering swimmers. They kill each year. Anchored yachts are in fact lifesaving for some swimmers. ( I have saved two on Rhodos )

I asked the Coastguard chief who decided where those boys came, and why, and he said “I do, and I dont need to give you a reason “ Meaning he could not.

Next day the problem was solved because all boys ware gone and a pile of molten yellow plastic lay on the beach. Dont know how the situation is now, I am talking long time ago.

That was the same guy who sent a female Coastguard to us on the floating pontoon in the main harbour to demand that we anchor and go stern to the floating pontoon. I said to the lady “It is 20 meters deep just off the pontoon, we dont carry 300 meters of chain. Real reason is that it is full of chains to hold the floating pontoon, good chance to loose your anchor. (And to give the diver a good days earning) On top of that there ware 6 yachts alongside the pontoon, one of them even lived there, and we ware the only ones who had to go stern to.

So up I went to the Coastguard office and asked why we and not the others had to move.

His answer: The others are not there, so we can not ask them. I told him that was because the others hid inside as soon as they saw someone coming. Bet they did not even pay.

So I stayed two more days and hid when the lady was spotted. Did not move the boat, that was impossible because I was not there.
Shades of Portugal.

Every so ofter the authorities visit the marina pontoons to inspect documentation and extract any fees they deem due. If the shipper is not on board they go way never to return.

Hide and (not) seek is a well known game. (y) ;)
 

Mistroma

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Currently in Scotland, boat in Greece (Ionian)
It's been known to happen in Spain. I knew an American who had lived on his boat for a couple of years and avoided officials whenever possible.
We saw him being stopped by customs or police when halfway up the main pontoon. They asked if he'd seen the American, he said no and carried on his way. It seemed to work well for him because his family were Spanish and he had spent most of his working life in Spanish speaking countries. He once told officials he was busy doing some work on deck and they just assumed he was a local workman, not the American owner.

It pays to blend in. :D
 

OldBawley

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Shades of Portugal.

Every so ofter the authorities visit the marina pontoons to inspect documentation and extract any fees they deem due. If the shipper is not on board they go way never to return.

Hide and (not) seek is a well known game. (y) ;)
Exactly, the same applied to the floating pontoon in Mandraki Rhodos. (20 years ago)

A small village of liveaboards always occupied the pontoon. No mooring fee´s and Rhodes was a paradise for drunks.

Never an empty space, so I used to moor second in a row. Stern anchor out and bow between two other yachts. Suspect nobody ever saw my boat was there.



I have among other things been a member of the marine military police for some years. So uniforms do not impress me, more the contrary.

Noticing the rude way some Greek officers treat visiting yachtsmen I am sure the way to get a (much desired) job with the Coastguard is to know somebody who knows somebody. And probably some money under the table by the family.

The way small weak men change into vocal brutes after been given a uniform and a belt with things dangling from it suggests that an education is not criterion nr1.

I said some, have met correct ones also.

The most correct ware French and Turkish. Italian…. Neh.
 

OldBawley

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9 Aug 2010
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Some other story, I am in a rant, meltem is blowing, no can sail.

Many years ago, I changed nationality. Was From Belgium and became Dutch. I was born on the border, worked and lived in Holland, had a Dutch sweetheart but was Belgian so had to pay twice the taxes the Dutch paid.

I changed nationality.

That implied I was summoned by the immigration police in Holland to appear in their offices.

Not a mutually agreed date, no, they said when.

I appeared and was led into an office full of people and was offered a chair in front of the immigration officer.

He probably had a hangover or a bad day and was rude. As he was always with the other people sitting in front of him. You know, Moroccans and Nigerians and so on.

He said “ you have to be here next Monday to perform a speech test. A dictation will be given blablabla. “

I stood up, clapped my hands and said for the whole office “I accept and I challenge you to take a writing match” See if YOU apply.

The silence in the office was deafening.

Then some boss came out of a separated office, invited me in and assured me I did not have to do a writing test. No more letters from the immigration police.
 
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