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Ugly or what?

Is this the dream boat that you would hire?

  • Yes, beautiful.

    Votes: 14 21.5%
  • No, Ugly

    Votes: 32 49.2%
  • As long as it sails I don't care

    Votes: 19 29.2%

  • Total voters
    65

JumbleDuck

Well-known member
Joined
8 Aug 2013
Messages
21,905
Location
SW Scotland
The rustler 36 is one boat that has stood the test of time and still being built today .
Can't think of any others but am sure there must be ?
Drascombes? Wharrams? Wayfarers? Squibs? Flying Fifteens? I can't think of any other long-lived sleep-aboard ones, except for Mr Wharram's trampolines of free love.
 

RJJ

Well-known member
Joined
14 Aug 2009
Messages
1,024
Which raises an interesting question: where do Sunsail clients get their aesthetic of boats from? In other words, what makes them think that one is "modern looking"?
You can ask the question the other way. A plumb bow gives some practical advantages: a bigger, deeper anchor locker without eating the forecabin,
longer waterline for given LOA, more stowage under the forepeak. Plenty of classic yachts' bow profiles were steep or nearly plumb until the fashion for steeply raked bows really caught on with the J's. Check the Jolie Brise and also many Laurent Giles designs.

What makes anyone think the pointy bow of a Contessa or 1970s S/S Swan is the classical look?

For me, the pain of the plumb bow on my boat is the anchor, which necessitates a rather long bow fitting, which I don't like much. Other than that, I like it.
 

JumbleDuck

Well-known member
Joined
8 Aug 2013
Messages
21,905
Location
SW Scotland
You can ask the question the other way. ... What makes anyone think the pointy bow of a Contessa or 1970s S/S Swan is the classical look?
Good point - though I personally think the Contessa 32 is a very dated example of 70s design, and the pointy bow is as much part of that as the triangularish transom.
That aside, most of us here have seen a fair number of yachts in our time, and I suspect that we'd mostly agree that everything built before our own boat was leading up to it and everything built since shows a sad decline. What I was really wondering is how people who aren't sailing enthusiasts get an idea of what is "new". "Classic" is fairly easy, because classic yachts are all over the place on biscuit tins, calendars, book covers and so on ... I confess that I hadn't myself realised that Dreadnought bows were in this year. Golly, they'll look dated in a few years.
 

Rappey

Well-known member
Joined
13 Dec 2019
Messages
1,552
I wonder if the boats that are still being built today are being built with the same quality components they originally had or have opted for the cheaper mdf and kitchen fittings?
 

pvb

Well-known member
Joined
16 May 2001
Messages
41,224
Location
UK East Coast
I wonder if the boats that are still being built today are being built with the same quality components they originally had or have opted for the cheaper mdf and kitchen fittings?
Which boats today feature MDF?
 

Rappey

Well-known member
Joined
13 Dec 2019
Messages
1,552
Sunseeker? Many interiors are mdf. I think they work on the assumption that most only go out on nice days and will not get water inside
Finding veneered marine ply nowadays is not an easy task
 

Rappey

Well-known member
Joined
13 Dec 2019
Messages
1,552
New boats seem to be back to square interiors rather than all rounded edges.(mdf panels ?)
I've no idea how many are now using mdf but I would guess it's a lot as they all seemed to have dropped stainless and brass butt hinges in favour of home kitchen hinges.
Shipwrights used to construct interiors, now you just need kitchen fitters to assemble all the pre made parts
 

pvb

Well-known member
Joined
16 May 2001
Messages
41,224
Location
UK East Coast
New boats seem to be back to square interiors rather than all rounded edges.(mdf panels ?)
I've no idea how many are now using mdf but I would guess it's a lot
Well, you've alleged Sunseeker use MDF, who are the others?
 

Rappey

Well-known member
Joined
13 Dec 2019
Messages
1,552
Google it. You will also find lots of posts on here discussing mdf interiors.
I find google search more useful for finding threads on here than the forums own search
I saw mdf in a new sunseeker maybe 18 years ago?
It's usually well veneered so not that easy to detect
 

pvb

Well-known member
Joined
16 May 2001
Messages
41,224
Location
UK East Coast
Google it. You will also find lots of posts on here discussing mdf interiors.
I find google search more useful for finding threads on here than the forums own search
I saw mdf in a new sunseeker maybe 18 years ago?
It's usually well veneered so not that easy to detect
There are lots of allegations on here that modern boats have MDF interiors, but I believe it's largely old wives' tales.

My 2014 Bavaria has a lot of what seems to be very substantial marine ply, with solid wood trim.
 

LONG_KEELER

Well-known member
Joined
21 Jul 2009
Messages
2,283
Location
East Coast
For better or worse it's now modular construction .

Even whole engines, beds the lot are often dropped in and then glassed.
Probably the same with galley, toilet/showers. Teak decks the same, computer generated with large sections before laying down.
Great chunks of electrics already made up and dropped in.

It has many advantages, mainly time as people are not getting in each other's way. It would be nice though if real boaty materials were still used.
 

Scala

Well-known member
Joined
21 Feb 2004
Messages
3,876
Location
Home: Saffron Walden. Boat: Swanwick
There are lots of allegations on here that modern boats have MDF interiors, but I believe it's largely old wives' tales.

My 2014 Bavaria has a lot of what seems to be very substantial marine ply, with solid wood trim.
I've bought two new Bavarias in the last 4 years (don't ask). Both have modern interiors which are machined in a factory. I've been out to Giebelstadt and seen the production lines. Anyway - as pvb suggests, it's bare marine ply where it's out of sight, veneeered marine ply for cabinets, and solid wood edges and doorframes. Teak in boat 1, walnut in boat 2. Mass produced for sure, doesn't have the hand tooled feel of an Oyster or an HR but it's very serviceable, fits properly, and is no doubt much cheaper.
 
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