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The Bear Necessities...

zoidberg

Well-known member
Joined
12 Nov 2016
Messages
3,948
Occasionally, there are 'sparks' of discussion about what is Essential, what is highly Desirable, and what is just Nice To Have. Mostly, they fizzle out or spin off into unproductive e-argument instead of interesting exchange of perspective and experience.

Those few who might be labelled 'Minimalist' still tend to have their little luxuries tucked away and, as we're speaking of solo, those tend to remain undiscussed and unknown. I know of more than one ocean-wanderer who likes to sail in carpet slippers; another carries a score of small Penguin books in a waterproof poly-box; another, a huge selection of music on USB pen-drives.... and we know of one who takes with him a wind-up gramophone and vinyl 'media' to play on it.

The Swedish sailing legend Sven Yrvind spent 78 days en route from Norway to Horta. Reportedly, he subsisted on tinned sardines and muesli. Also reportedly, he grew rather tired of it.


What would YOU consider Essential to keep body and soul together? And what would you classify - for you - would be your Little Luxuries...?
 
Joined
31 Oct 2020
Messages
430
Tinned sardines, especially in olive oil, are palatable, easy to store, and will keep you going; but hot curry paste, fresh and dried chillies, English mustard and plenty of pepper make life worth living!
Muesli would be ideal if you keep rabbits on board.
 

25931

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Joined
22 Aug 2008
Messages
3,266
Location
Portugal-Algarve
Tinned sardines, especially in olive oil, are palatable, easy to store, and will keep you going; but hot curry paste, fresh and dried chillies, English mustard and plenty of pepper make life worth living!
Muesli would be ideal if you keep rabbits on board.
I prefer canned tunny to sardine and before someone uses the American "tuna" here we call it "atum" but whatever its my favourite.
 

zoidberg

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Joined
12 Nov 2016
Messages
3,948
#4

Oh, yus....

Now, should I prefer a stash of McVities Digestives..... or Half-Covereds.... for my long-voyage luxuries?
 

pandos

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Joined
15 Oct 2004
Messages
1,422
Location
Ireland, (Crosshaven)
I always considered a luxury to be a bottle of red wine (or two) and a pizza once I had tied up, dropped the hook etc. I think it is in part the smell of cooking and the warmth of the oven...(probably not appropriate in the middle of the Atlantic)

so I think I will adopt Robin Knox Johnson's practice of taking an hour off from 5 to 6pm and having a glass of whiskey and just thinking and smoking a ciggy. (since I don't smoke I'll probably dunk chocolate hobnobs in the whiskey)

As for simple material luxury, I have the plywood inner from the top of an office chair which is springy but still supportive and can be put anywhere in the cockpit or on deck to provide a really comfortable seat...
 

zoidberg

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Joined
12 Nov 2016
Messages
3,948
As I recall R K-J also had the excellent practice of 'declaring a headland' whenever something noteable had been achieved - such as 'best days run' or 'coming out of a wild night into a better day' - and breaking out the 'Good Cheer'.

There's a chunk of seamanship they don't teach on yer RYA courses.
 

Baggywrinkle

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Joined
6 Mar 2010
Messages
8,058
Location
Ammersee, Bavaria / Adriatic & Free to roam Europe
A sailing boat with hot shower, solar powered fridge and electrics, a galley with enough space to cook a good meal - and somewhere warm where you can spend the entire day in shorts and T-Shirt, finally, a good dinghy with an outboard powerful enough to plane ..... I'm happy with what I've got:

 

pandos

Well-known member
Joined
15 Oct 2004
Messages
1,422
Location
Ireland, (Crosshaven)
A sailing boat with hot shower, solar powered fridge and electrics, a galley with enough space to cook a good meal - and somewhere warm where you can spend the entire day in shorts and T-Shirt, finally, a good dinghy with an outboard powerful enough to plane ..... I'm happy with what I've got:

This is the Jester Challenge Forum. A certain amount of self flagalation is normal😁😁
 

zoidberg

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Joined
12 Nov 2016
Messages
3,948
Sorry to have sullied your forum with video of an AWB :oops:
Better than sullying it with video of some of the knackered ould wrecks that 'some people' go Jestering in! :LOL:

And as for 'flagelation', it would need to be 'self', of course.... 'cos we does it solo, innit! The hot shower and good meal can be had at the Baltimore SC clubhouse...... Can't promise the balmy Mediterannean weather. Forty-knot fog and horizontal rain, more like! :eek:
 

pandos

Well-known member
Joined
15 Oct 2004
Messages
1,422
Location
Ireland, (Crosshaven)
I do apologise ..... the thread turned up in the "What's new" list and I didn't notice which forum it was.

Sorry to have sullied your forum with video of an AWB :oops:
Your video of a pristine yacht in flat blue water and the sun shining with talk of hot showers and planing tenders just made me envious and more bitter and twisted than usual...hope not to have caused any offence☺☺
 

eebygum

Member
Joined
6 Nov 2002
Messages
302
Location
Manchester
Occasionally, there are 'sparks' of discussion about what is Essential, what is highly Desirable, and what is just Nice To Have. Mostly, they fizzle out or spin off into unproductive e-argument instead of interesting exchange of perspective and experience.

Those few who might be labelled 'Minimalist' still tend to have their little luxuries tucked away and, as we're speaking of solo, those tend to remain undiscussed and unknown. I know of more than one ocean-wanderer who likes to sail in carpet slippers; another carries a score of small Penguin books in a waterproof poly-box; another, a huge selection of music on USB pen-drives.... and we know of one who takes with him a wind-up gramophone and vinyl 'media' to play on it.

The Swedish sailing legend Sven Yrvind spent 78 days en route from Norway to Horta. Reportedly, he subsisted on tinned sardines and muesli. Also reportedly, he grew rather tired of it.


What would YOU consider Essential to keep body and soul together? And what would you classify - for you - would be your Little Luxuries...?
I also follow the Robin Knox Johnson advice and make a really good fruit cake soaked in Rum for my cruises, including the last JC ( I did tweet him a few years ago asking for his recipe but he never replied, I suspect it’s a family secret)
 

Gitane

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Joined
18 Dec 2010
Messages
4,309
Location
Near Maldon, Essex
I have entered for the JBC and the JAC this year.

For steering, I am considering using a combination of tiller pilot (I carry two) and sheet to tiller steering.

I know that many single handed sailors strongly recommend a proper windvane and maybe that is indeed the way to go. However on the other hand people like Webb Chiles and Len Hilley of this Forum have sailed many thousands of miles with just that kind of equipment.

Still not 100% decided and I will do some more trials as soon as the lockdowns are finished, but if I do go this way, then the bare necessities for steering anyway are:-

1) Tiller Pilot (plus a spare)
2) Bungies and lines.
 

Gargleblaster

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Joined
16 Dec 2003
Messages
1,139
Location
Medway, Gillingham Reach
I think the best investment I ever made was my original Windpilot Pacific Light. It is really easy to setup, is almost set and forget unless the wind changes direction. I believe the Windpilot is the most rugged of designs - my Pacific Light has survived two severe knockdowns in the North Atlantic (F10 and 10 metre waves and my Pacific has survived one severe knockdown in the Southern Ocean (close to 'the Shipbreaker'). Lot of damage to deck gear in all cases but not to the Windpilots.

My only issue has been that my newest boat has a transom hung rudder and I have had to build a frame to hang the Pacific Light. I also had to order a remote adjustment device so it is not a lean over teh stern to adjust direction.
 

Pye_End

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Joined
5 Feb 2006
Messages
4,375
Location
N Kent Coast
1) Tiller Pilot (plus a spare)
2) Bungies and lines.
A tiller pilot will use a lot of power - probably rather more than you use in a coastal environment. If you want to rely on sheet to tiller steering it would be worth being sure that this is the method for you well before you go - nothing worse than getting all prepared for JAC, getting 2 or 3 days out and then having to turn back for something like this.

Would be interested to hear how you get on with sheet to tiller. Looks good on Youtube, though never personally tried it.
 

Pye_End

Well-known member
Joined
5 Feb 2006
Messages
4,375
Location
N Kent Coast
I also had to order a remote adjustment device so it is not a lean over teh stern to adjust direction.
Do they do a kit for this? When I looked at the Pacific Light and Sea Feather it was one factor in the Sea Feather's favour. My lines go back to the cabin so no need to go outside to trim the steering.
 

Gargleblaster

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Joined
16 Dec 2003
Messages
1,139
Location
Medway, Gillingham Reach
Do they do a kit for this? When I looked at the Pacific Light and Sea Feather it was one factor in the Sea Feather's favour. My lines go back to the cabin so no need to go outside to trim the steering.
If you buy the Pacific Light I think a remote adjustment device is standard now . I bought my Pacific Light for the 2006 JC to use on a UFO27 which it was easy to sit on the cockpit seat at the rear and adjust the direction. Getting up closer also gave me a better idea at night exactly where I was adjusting it to. On my Invicta with a frame and lazerette to lean over I thought it was better to adjust it remotely. Even though I am always clipped on in the cockpit it can be a bit hairy hanging over the stern when th e waves get a bit mountainous.

The Windpilot Pacific which I use on my Rival 34 has always had a remote adjustment but I have to use a torch at night either on my head or gripped in my mouth to do fine adjustment. On my Rival while the Windpilot is bolted onto the transom I also have a lazerette that I would have to lean over to adjust the steering.
 
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