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Storm jib

Joined
18 Apr 2004
Messages
0
Location
Italy
Does anyone else feel the terms storm jib and working jib are not well defined?

If an unfurled genoa is OK up to top of F4, then for the wkg jib to be OK to top of F7, the simple area ratio is about 4:1. For a storm jib to be OK to top of F9, the area ratio seems to be about 8:1.

I suppose the same questions apply to main reefing areas.

Has anyone a reference to published material which would indicate the typical figures a sailmaker might use, or a seasoned skipper would choose?
 

gus

Member
Joined
16 May 2001
Messages
372
Location
Larkhall, South Lanarkshire
What amount of sail you carry will depend on what type, size and weight of boat you have. So there will be a different set of 'sailmakers' figures for each type. Depending of which angle the wind is at, a force 7 could for me be a great sail with everything up, when all around me are scuttling about with all reefed down.
 
Joined
18 Apr 2004
Messages
0
Location
Italy
Well, there is a lot of truth in what you say.. but, surely, if we are sailing in a wind with a pressure of, say, four times what we would accept with a full genoa, then a sail of one-quarter the size would be called for - irrespective of the boat? Or do you think I am over-simplifying.

I fear that the new Scuttlebut format makes thread-following too difficult - I would not have seen your reply if I had not accidentally scrolled down to it. I have not yeat figured out the way the threads work -they seem counterintuitive.
 
G

Guest

Guest
I'm sure I saw an article on this recently (May?) in PBO.

I think there's an "official" (i.e. RYA or something) definition that relates the "storm jib" and "trysail" areas relevant to the normal foresail and mainsail areas.

Best regards :eek:)

Ian D
 

peterb

New member
Joined
16 May 2001
Messages
2,834
Location
Radlett, Herts
Sailmaker\'s storm jib

From experience, I would say that most sailmakers make their stom jibs too big. Great for a force 8, but when it really starts to blow (10 plus) I want something smaller, thanks.

On the question of the Scuttlebutt thread sequences, I find that the new system is much better. By using the 'Expand' button I can see all the threads without having to re-read the first contribution, and the arrangement is so similar to the Windows filing system that reading it is almost intuitive.

<P ID="edit"><FONT SIZE=-1>Edited by peterb on Fri Jun 1 22:46:21 2001 (server time).</FONT></P>
 
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