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Sea Snot in the Sea of Marmara

mjcoon

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18 Jun 2011
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3,472
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Berkshire, UK
Funny it is put down to global warning whereas as the article makes clear it is really eutrophication, as in red tides etc e.g. around Venice which is also too enclosed.
 

TernVI

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8 Jul 2020
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Funny it is put down to global warning whereas as the article makes clear it is really eutrophication, as in red tides etc e.g. around Venice which is also too enclosed.
Is that EU trophication?
 

Irish Rover

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5 Feb 2017
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Türkiye
Probably not by digging the proposed black sea canal; the go-to answer is reduce agricultural run-off, as this absorbs free oxygen like billy-oh.
I'm no expert but I'm not sure agricultural run-off is a big issue in that area. Intensive animal husbandry is not common. It's a heavily populated area with Istanbul and Bursa alone having a combined population of some 20m so it's more likely human waste and industrial discharges are the main causes.
Kanal Istanbul doesn't seem to make much sense on any level but maybe the increased circulation might even help the Marmara.
 

penfold

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25 Aug 2003
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4,545
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On the Clyde
I'm no expert but I'm not sure agricultural run-off is a big issue in that area. Intensive animal husbandry is not common. It's a heavily populated area with Istanbul and Bursa alone having a combined population of some 20m so it's more likely human waste and industrial discharges are the main causes.
Kanal Istanbul doesn't seem to make much sense on any level but maybe the increased circulation might even help the Marmara.
From what I've read it will change the salinity hugely and kill off more or less all local species; untreated or inadequately treated sewage will also dramatically affect O2 levels, so you are probably right.
 

penfold

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25 Aug 2003
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4,545
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On the Clyde
Mucilage pie? Sago, but made with mucilage?

In most cases, the substance itself is not harmful. “What we see is basically a combination of protein, carbohydrates and fat,” said Dr Neslihan Özdelice, a marine biologist at Istanbul University.
They should stop moaning and get on with harvesting this bounty of the sea and pouring it into bio-digesters, it will produce methane and the effluvia can be spread on fields. When life gives you lemons, etc.
 
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