• UPDATED INFORMATION & ADVICE - PLEASE READ NOW

    'I didn't know/I wasn't told' will not be a valid defence if you fail to comply and lose your access to the off-topic area, core topic areas, or the entire YBW forum as a result. Full details can be found here, please read before you proceed.

Question on fixing hull damage whilst underway.

Rappey

Well-known member
Joined
13 Dec 2019
Messages
3,317
In this video they try different methods of filling a hole.

 

pandos

Well-known member
Joined
15 Oct 2004
Messages
2,015
Location
Ireland, (Crosshaven)
In this video they try different methods of filling a hole.

The method with the ply followed up by a ply patch on the inside all screwed in place with tecscrews would seem like a good option...maybe with a lump of epoxy or other self curing material in between.
 

sailor211

Active member
Joined
17 Oct 2007
Messages
1,712
Location
Gosport : Boat Soon to be Gosport
Inaccessible areas of the inside of the hull make me uneasy. Most yachts have them, but there is a wide range, from a sparsely fitted-out old Colchester smack, to the floating yuppie apartment type of a gin-palace.
Might I suggest that the forward parts of the hull are more likely to hit a floating treetrunk, or an awash shipping container, therefore they should be a higher priority for access than the ass end?
I like the sound of those screws.
When I did the Atlantic the wife bought me an axe to be used to access a hole behind all the nice woodwork. If the water was pouring in I would use it.
 

sailor211

Active member
Joined
17 Oct 2007
Messages
1,712
Location
Gosport : Boat Soon to be Gosport
My thoughts

I have a big powered bilge pump. Direct to battery. If I hit something I should start the engine immediately to keep the power. This gives you two hands free to sort out the leak.

If you can keep oxygen getting to it builders foam works . Did this on a deck where the shroud pulled out. It sticks to wet hands and takes weeks to get off !

a sail pulled over the outside will slow the flow.

someone makes a device like a mini umbrella to push through from the inside.

Rubber and wood bungs is my first thought. Plus something like CT1 on a tea towel for the uneven bits

Liferaft inflated inside will stop boat from sinking but I am not sure I am that brave
 

zoidberg

Well-known member
Joined
12 Nov 2016
Messages
4,563
A battery drill would be essential...you often get a head with the packs of screws...
Good thinking. I've acquired an AldiLidl battery drill-cum-several-other-functions specifically for the boat. One feature is an angle grinder... with 1mm stainless cutting discs, I reckon it would make short work of cutting away a tangle of s/s shrouds.

Yes, and a second battery, charged, makes better sense to me than an expensive set of wire cutters that aren't quite up to the job.
 

sailor211

Active member
Joined
17 Oct 2007
Messages
1,712
Location
Gosport : Boat Soon to be Gosport
Good thinking. I've acquired an AldiLidl battery drill-cum-several-other-functions specifically for the boat. One feature is an angle grinder... with 1mm stainless cutting discs, I reckon it would make short work of cutting away a tangle of s/s shrouds.

Yes, and a second battery, charged, makes better sense to me than an expensive set of wire cutters that aren't quite up to the job.
When the rigging is on the deck, a small handheld set of cutters to remove the split pins then knock the cotter pins through. I have done this it worked for me.
 

BobnLesley

Well-known member
Joined
1 Dec 2005
Messages
2,860
Location
Aground in Yorkshire awaiting a very high tide
Inaccessible areas of the inside of the hull make me uneasy...
Tell me about it. When we were inspecting our last yacht whilst buying it, I discovered that to get up even the starboard side of the saloon floor for access took almost ten minutes, whilst the port side came up easily, it only did so once you'd removed the starboard side AND the saloon table; that configuration was just about the first thing I changed.
Re the original post, we had and carried an 'offshore crash repair kit' which contained some two part underwater epoxy, repair cloth and various other bits and pieces all contained in a neat plastic case. Given that I couldn't find any reference to it online just now, I suspect it's no longer sold, which suggests that it wasn't very good and so it's perhaps doubly fortunate that we never had to use it?
 

BobnLesley

Well-known member
Joined
1 Dec 2005
Messages
2,860
Location
Aground in Yorkshire awaiting a very high tide
... an angle grinder... with 1mm stainless cutting discs, I reckon it would make short work of cutting away a tangle of s/s shrouds and a second battery, charged, makes better sense to me than an expensive set of wire cutters that aren't quite up to the job.
Whilst agreeing with you about wire/bolt cutters I suspect that in the conditions you're likely to lose the rig in, you're unlikely whilst offshore to easily wander around with a dremel/mini-grinder cutting them free; a hacksaw with GOOD quality blades shifts them quickly; a frightened man with a hacksaw is up there performance wise with the chap holding a bailing-bucket.
 

zoidberg

Well-known member
Joined
12 Nov 2016
Messages
4,563
I suspect that in the conditions you're likely to lose the rig in, you're unlikely whilst offshore to easily wander around with a dremel/mini-grinder cutting them free
Most of us refer to our own experiences when considering solutions to problems such as this. My 'limited experience' occurred during a black night in the centre of the Irish Sea, when the mast of a newly-purchased trimaran came down. It emerged later that the forestay top toggle had been missed out and, as the rigger man said, 'you can bend stainless once'.....

That mast and its attached boom were laid across the port ama/float, 'scissoring'. We didn't have much in the way of tools - not my boat - and had to take some pliers to the split pins and cotter pins, out on the far corner of the boat. Bouncing about in the aftermath of a gale, I needed at times more than both hands to hang on - it was one occasion when I chose NOT to clip on.

The few tools we had needed two hands - as would the standard-issue wire rope cutters. I DO carry a hacksaw with a bundle of dedicated fresh blades, but reckon a battery-driven angle grinder would be faster. So also would 'R-pins'.

As for the suggested 'dremel/mini-grinder', I fancy such would struggle with rigging wire of even 1.0mm diameter..... so simply a 'mickey mouse' tool good only for lopping-off boiled eggs.
 
Last edited:

BigAlbatrossBird

New member
Joined
19 Sep 2021
Messages
15
Inaccessible areas of the inside of the hull make me uneasy. Most yachts have them, but there is a wide range, from a sparsely fitted-out old Colchester smack, to the floating yuppie apartment type of a gin-palace.
That always troubled me when I had a Centaur. Westerly in their wisdom decided to make the cabin sole between the bilge keels a structural element of the boat with no access at all. You'd be unlikely to get hulled down there but if you did there'd be nothing you could do about it without hacking through 2-3 inches of whatever it was they put down there to stiffen the boat.
 
Top