Progress On My Dayboat

Lakesailor

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I collected the Dockrell last month










It had the interior completely stripped out including the bonded-in floor which created the self-draining cockpit and which gives problems on these boats.

Since then I have glassed in some new floor bearers at the "normal" level and some side bench bearers. Renewed some bits of locker wood. All the wood I have added has been epoxy coated and thickened epoxy has been used to bond the wood. Then additional woven cloth and resin secures the new additions.






I have decided to paint the interior in Garage Floor paint. we'll see how it goes. My little Orkney-style boat was done in that and it seemed to last well.
















I've also made a bracket to lower the outboard, which is a shortshaft. I had to remove a plywood pad and fill many holes in the transom.




I've also been scraping the sh*tty brown antifoul off to reveal shiny gelcoat beneath. For a dry-sailed boat, ideal.





I've got a bit bogged down in trying to keep on top of snagging bits and pieces, so have started two separate lists.

I still need to actually rig the boat, which should be my next part of the project.
 
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Nice job Lakesailor,

that goes for the stage of refit photo's too, I usually forget.

just get some fun in before we lose the summer !
 
D

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Very good Lakesailor and quite inspirational too; I need to pick up the pace on my own tub.
 

prv

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Looks very nice - amazing what a difference a coat of paint makes!

Pity about the flange around the centreboard case. Could you not have ground that off, or did you leave it for strength? Perhaps some kind of boxing-in below it?

Is there ballast under that sole?

Pete
 

Lakesailor

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That's what I mean about getting bogged down. I epoxy-coated the floor panels and then varnished them, Just two coats so far. Then I scratched one and a side bench knee whilst juggling the floor panel.
The repair came to the top of my list.
It should have been added to do later. The finishes are still quite soft and will probably mark a bit more yet. It's better to leave them until there are a few bits to do and then let it well alone for a week or two whilst they harden.

That's why I am moving on to getting rigged (which means I will be ready for a test-sail)
 

Lakesailor

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Looks very nice - amazing what a difference a coat of paint makes!

Pity about the flange around the centreboard case. Could you not have ground that off, or did you leave it for strength? Perhaps some kind of boxing-in below it?

Is there ballast under that sole?

Pete
I was in two minds about the flange. It is almost a decorative cover for the actual case. The flange had the original floor panel bonded to it.
I have cut it down to about an inch or so, but as you suggest, if I take it off altogether it may be too flappy. I have bonded the cover and the case together at the mast step end using Fibrogel, a grp paste with glass fibres in it. I could do that at a few points along it's length. Then I could bond some battens to the case below the cover and fix some hardwood covers over the centreboard. The reinforcing webs would be a bit awkward, but I needed them to keep the centreboard case/mast step rigidly in position.
On the other hand I may trim it back a bit and put an edging strip over it to make it ankle-friendly. Some edges in the boat already have plastic coated spring clipped strip on. The pic of the aft locker shows it at the top of the doors.
This stuff is £2.66 per metre.



I don't object to the centreboard case showing..



In the 6th and 7th shot you can see a slab ahead of the centreboard casing. That is 200 lbs of resin and steel shot. It seems to be bonded to the hull. I have pried away the rotten ply which was glassed to it (probably as a mould to contain the mix when it was cast in-situ) and coated the edges of the block in epoxy resin and filler to contain the escapee steel shot.
 
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PuffTheMagicDragon

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Looking good; very neat and practical. Do you plan on leaving the aft ends of the seats unsupported or will something else be added at a later stage?
 

Lakesailor

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Is it a swing out type of plywood keel, or a piece of steel plate? nice job by the way.
It's a solid grp centreplate. The pivot is right at the front of the case directly under the mast step and about 4" from the floor.

The rudder blade is of the same construction.




Looking good; very neat and practical. Do you plan on leaving the aft ends of the seats unsupported or will something else be added at a later stage?
I'll see how it goes. The battens the seat has underneath to hold it together were all that the benches had to support them when they sat on grp chambers in it's previous incarnation.


Even with one cheek at each side of the last knee the weight will still be taken by that knee. There is a surprising amount of beam strength in those hardwood strakes.
 
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Lakesailor,

have you decided to go totally without buoyancy / beyonce then ?

I can understand this but have seen Wayfarers in trouble in F6 at N Windermere, and doubt a PLB would be much use ?

Is it really a case of ' let it sink & swim home ' if a really bad knock-down happened ?

Yours ?
 

Lakesailor

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The aft locker doors have a very fine fit and the box in the bow is sealed. That'll do for me. There are many boats on Windermere without buoyancy. The Windermere class yachts are not allowed buoyancy
 
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' Not allowed buoyancy ' - that must be the most elitest Darwinism I've ever heard !

' Must improve the value of my boat ' might also be a misguided part of it until the class dwindles to unsustainable and a footnote in history replaced by something plastic 49'ers or Toppers, let alone losing good boats...:rolleyes:
 

jerrytug

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It's a solid grp centreplate. The pivot is right at the front of the case directly under the mast step and about 4" from the floor.

The rudder blade is of the same construction.





I'll see how it goes. The battens the seat has underneath to hold it together were all that the benches had to support them when they sat on grp chambers in it's previous incarnation.


Even with one cheek at each side of the last knee the weight will still be taken by that knee. There is a surprising amount of beam strength in those hardwood strakes.
If I tried to use that folding footrest, on the rudder, it would just break off, and I would splash back in the water!

A tidy job by the way, the curve of the seating boards looks very smart.
 

Lakesailor

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