• REMINDER - COVID-19

    Any content, information, or advice found on social media platforms and the wider Internet, including forums such as YBW, should NOT be acted upon unless checked against a reliable, authoritative source, and re-checked, particularly where personal health and liberty is at stake. Seek professional advice/confirmation before acting on such at all times.

    Users who are found to promulgate FAKE NEWS on the forum in regard to this issue, intentional or otherwise, may find their access terminated. It is your responsibility to provide references to bona fide sources.

    FAKE NEWS, in this regard, is that which is posited by organisations, media, etc., that is repeated on the forum, or used to support personal opinion/hypothesis posted by users - FAKE NEWS is not necessarily the personal opinion/hypothesis being posted in itself, any issues with such should be challenged respectfully.

    IN ADDITION it seems that conspiracy theories are finding their way onto the forum. This is not the place for such content. Users who post it may find their access limited or permanently suspended. Please leave it where you find it.

New in here and looking for advice

Windy_Stu

Member
Joined
11 Nov 2007
Messages
95
Location
Chichester
Are you British? If so, have you considered the 90/180 rule for Brits being in the EU after Jan 2021?
Yep thats why the Thames for a couple of years to sort out the boat...then hopefully cross the channel and back in the 90 days... Brexit is the gift that keeps on giving :)
 

Scapegoat

New member
Joined
16 Nov 2020
Messages
21
Ah so my bad.. that is exactly what I'm looking at....so they are not "wide beams" ? what make a boat a wide beam then??...I just thought something wider than 6'6 narrow boat :)..... yes defo Steel for me...I took my GRP cat though the midi and sweated every time a big metal boat joined me in the lock :cool:
OK, assuming that you are considering purchasing a steel aft cabin boat for the Thames and European waterways, these are some considerations.

Category B if you want to cross the channel - or C if you are transporting

Single engine is probably more suitable for the river as you have a protected prop

Be aware of depth and height and width (locks) restrictions for the river, bridges and locks - see River Thames: distances and measurements for boaters

River licence cost is dependent on length x beam and you’ll need a current Boat Safety Certificate

River Licence requires a base mooring - ie continuous cruising licence not available.

Some marinas do not allow residential mooring and residential moorings on the Thames are not readily available.

Bankside moorings can be shallow and many overnight moorings are time limited and levy a daily fee. In high season it can be difficult to find an overnight mooring on some stretches of the river.

Water capacity - whilst there are water points at some locks, if you want to stay put then its useful to have lots of water available. Ditto holding tank (mandatory for Thames use)

Power capacity - generator/solar & batteries

Hot water - a hydronic system or diesel boiler means you are not reliant on running the engine or generator

It's worth joining one of the Thames based cruising clubs as you'll always be able to get local advice and find like minded friends

Probably other points I’ve missed but hope these help in your decision.
 

Windy_Stu

Member
Joined
11 Nov 2007
Messages
95
Location
Chichester
OK, assuming that you are considering purchasing a steel aft cabin boat for the Thames and European waterways, these are some considerations.

Category B if you want to cross the channel - or C if you are transporting

Single engine is probably more suitable for the river as you have a protected prop

Be aware of depth and height and width (locks) restrictions for the river, bridges and locks - see River Thames: distances and measurements for boaters

River licence cost is dependent on length x beam and you’ll need a current Boat Safety Certificate

River Licence requires a base mooring - ie continuous cruising licence not available.

Some marinas do not allow residential mooring and residential moorings on the Thames are not readily available.

Bankside moorings can be shallow and many overnight moorings are time limited and levy a daily fee. In high season it can be difficult to find an overnight mooring on some stretches of the river.

Water capacity - whilst there are water points at some locks, if you want to stay put then its useful to have lots of water available. Ditto holding tank (mandatory for Thames use)

Power capacity - generator/solar & batteries

Hot water - a hydronic system or diesel boiler means you are not reliant on running the engine or generator

It's worth joining one of the Thames based cruising clubs as you'll always be able to get local advice and find like minded friends

Probably other points I’ve missed but hope these help in your decision.
Thanks Scapegoat...that is very useful... especially the link....how easy is it to find emptying points for holding tanks?
 

Windy_Stu

Member
Joined
11 Nov 2007
Messages
95
Location
Chichester
Like a wide steel narrowboat probably between 10 and 14 feet beam, designed Category C for waves no higher than 0.5m.
Thanks for the clarification...I will defo go for a B class... I would like option to cross channel and or have the possibility to coastal cruise in UK
 

Scapegoat

New member
Joined
16 Nov 2020
Messages
21
Thanks Scapegoat...that is very useful... especially the link....how easy is it to find emptying points for holding tanks?
Most marinas have pump-outs plus the hire boat yards. There are also some EA pump out stations but they are often out of service
 

Scapegoat

New member
Joined
16 Nov 2020
Messages
21
Probably the best reference book for the Thames is Imray’s The River Thames Book by Chris Cove-Smith ISBN 9781846237157
 

oldgit

Well-known member
Joined
6 Nov 2001
Messages
22,835
Location
Medway
MATILDA has been all around UK.
Skippered by Timothy Spall
Currently moored in herwinter mooring in Ramsgate.
Powered by a very nice Perkins M135.
 

Windy_Stu

Member
Joined
11 Nov 2007
Messages
95
Location
Chichester
MATILDA has been all around UK.
Skippered by Timothy Spall
Currently moored in herwinter mooring in Ramsgate.
Powered by a very nice Perkins M135.
Hi Old Git... That sounds like you do exactly what plan to do.... I was daydreaming yesterday and it looked like Ramsgate is first place to stop after St Kathrine's?.... how far is it and how long does it take...I assume Matilda is displacement 7ktish??
 

Chris_d

Well-known member
Joined
15 Jun 2001
Messages
4,348
Location
Oxfordshire
Ah so my bad.. that is exactly what I'm looking at....so they are not "wide beams" ? what make a boat a wide beam then??...I just thought something wider than 6'6 narrow boat :)..... yes defo Steel for me...I took my GRP cat though the midi and sweated every time a big metal boat joined me in the lock :cool:
Glad you clarified the wide beam bit, yes the definition has changed over the years, I can remember too when it only meant a boat that couldn't fit in the narrow canal locks. But now more commonly it is a err... a wide version of a narrow boat, which is probably not what you are after.
As suggested look at the Brooms, Atlantics, large Westwoods and Dutch steel, although all the Dutch stuff is less good at sea and will roll a lot, thats if you are serious about doing coastal cruising. Almost anything can cross the channel once on a good day just to access the canals.
I'd forget Matilda, that is doing it the hard way and you will need a strong stomach at sea!
 

oldgit

Well-known member
Joined
6 Nov 2001
Messages
22,835
Location
Medway
Hi Old Git... That sounds like you do exactly what plan to do.... I was daydreaming yesterday and it looked like Ramsgate is first place to stop after St Kathrine's?.... how far is it and how long does it take...I assume Matilda is displacement 7ktish??
Unless you are really really keen or have no need of sleep, would suggest that you break that journey at Queenborough.
It is approx 50 miles from St Kats or Limehouse to Queenborough and would suggest with a bit of ebb tide 7- 8 knots would about right. Around 6 hours (ish)
Queenborough to Ramsgate is about 35 miles (depending on exact route) so about 5 hours.
For those unfamiliar with coastal trips a couple of knots of tides against you and a few decent waves can add considerably to your transit times and fuel consumption.
Boating is supposed to be enjoyable not some sort elimination test for joining the SAS.:)
A little time spent planning is never ever wasted. :)

All that info came from an old ipad with Navionics total cost about £150 and all sitting on my sofa. :)
 

Windy_Stu

Member
Joined
11 Nov 2007
Messages
95
Location
Chichester
Unless you are really really keen or have no need of sleep, would suggest that you break that journey at Queenborough.
It is approx 50 miles from St Kats or Limehouse to Queenborough and would suggest with a bit of ebb tide 7- 8 knots would about right. Around 6 hours (ish)
Queenborough to Ramsgate is about 35 miles (depending on exact route) so about 5 hours.
For those unfamiliar with coastal trips a couple of knots of tides against you and a few decent waves can add considerably to your transit times and fuel consumption.
Boating is supposed to be enjoyable not some sort elimination test for joining the SAS.:)
A little time spent planning is never ever wasted. :)

All that info came from an old ipad with Navionics total cost about £150 and all sitting on my sofa. :)
Thanks... as I say just day dreaming...
 

Windy_Stu

Member
Joined
11 Nov 2007
Messages
95
Location
Chichester
Glad you clarified the wide beam bit, yes the definition has changed over the years, I can remember too when it only meant a boat that couldn't fit in the narrow canal locks. But now more commonly it is a err... a wide version of a narrow boat, which is probably not what you are after.
As suggested look at the Brooms, Atlantics, large Westwoods and Dutch steel, although all the Dutch stuff is less good at sea and will roll a lot, thats if you are serious about doing coastal cruising. Almost anything can cross the channel once on a good day just to access the canals.
I'd forget Matilda, that is doing it the hard way and you will need a strong stomach at sea!
Currant favorite at the moment is a De Groot..... I own a cat and have crossed several times... the cats dont role much tho :)...frankly I think Brexit may have put an end to canals for me but was toying with spending a couple of years on the Thames then maybe a slow trip down to the west country or maybe even take a truck down somewhere... nice to dream :)
 
Top