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Keel / Hull Repair - DIY’able?

Wandering Star

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I’m looking for a tidy boat for a low budget! There’s a Hummingbird 30 listed on eBay which would very much fill the bill EXCEPT for the fact there’s been some damage done with a temporary repair made, to an area of the hull just forward of the starboard bilge keel. Researching the design there’s mention of some strengthening required of the bilge keel attachment area. I’m wondering if the damage on this particular boat was in fact accidental or the result of the known weakness in the area? I’m pososting a picture taken from the eBay ad.

What do you guys think? And do you think a strengthening/reinforcing job is within the capabilities of a DIY’er or would a pro job be required?
 

White socks

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I was looking at this listing earlier today, not sure I’d entertain it, but if your handy with glassing then it is doable.
as my friend once said to me...nothing more expensive than a cheap boat.
 

TernVI

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That could be quite easy to fix, or a complete nightmare.
It would largely depend on what was 'in the way' inside.
It's going to want a generous amount of GRP work, but that is not particularly hard or even time consuming.
Add some no-nonsense floors and stringers. Re-laminate the damaged bits of hull.

The hard and time consuming bit will be putting the interior woodwork back together nicely.
My guess is those keels are spaced such that you'd need to disturb settee berth fronts and maybe the main bulkhead?

There would also be issues regarding keeping the hull shape and alignment while all the damaged structure is removed.

You could write yourself a project plan and method statement for getting back up together and tot up the £££ and hours.

Link to the ebay listing?
 

PetiteFleur

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I also saw it on ebay - certainly it should be repairable, I would get a surveyor to advise AND also ask about the engine which sounds as though it's been semi-submerged with the starter motor defunct? I would insist on seeing the engine running, even if you bought a new/rebuilt starter. Make a low offer and see what response you get.
 

Biggles Wader

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I think you could do a lot better for that money. Might be worth a punt if it was being given away but otherwise--------
 

cueball

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That is not a cheap boat! If you don’t do it yourself, and in that area around a keel I wouldn’t, it’s a big job, a lot of the interior will need removing and refitting. It will take a lot of time that you could be sailing! Ask me how I know !!
 

mickywillis

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Looks like the lifting strops were positioned right on the front end of the bilge keels judging by the marks in the blue antifoul? Perhaps the strop cut into the GRP just ahead or there was a wood block or something left on the strop when the boat was lifted and it punctured the hull?
 

Stemar

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I can't help thinking that if you're asking the question, the answer is no, it isn't DIYable.

That's one place a hard grounding on one keel would cause damage but, if so, there's likely to be damage at the aft end of the keel and that's going to be a big job. Expedition Evans on Youtube took it on on a big fin, and are doing a good job, but I rather think you'd rather go sailing. Their repairs involved completely stripping out the interior of the saloon and months of work.
 
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TernVI

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Search on ebay for 'Humminbird 30 bilge keel yacht' Note spelling...
The 'g' makes a difference!
Humminbird 30 Bilge Keel Yacht | eBay

Looking at the pictures of the interior, there looks (at a glance) to be a lot of woodwork and probably an interior moulding making access inside quite difficult. A lot of work to rebuild that after fixing the hull I suspect. Maybe some would see that as an opportunity to change the interior to a different style or layout.
All do-able for those with the right skills, time and energy.



Plus, bits of the interior will be water damaged.

I think the answer to 'is it DIY-able?' might be along the lines of ' it's not going to be viable to pay someone to do the work, so DIY is the only way'.
What would it be worth in a seaworthy condition?
 

Wandering Star

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Appreciate everyones thoughts and I think its what I needed - a reality check! I can tackle most boaty jobs but the mention of removing & then refitting large chunks of interior joinery for access is beyond my skill set for sure! I’m going to pass on this - anyone knowing of a similar sized (28 - 30 feet) doer upper going cheaply, please let me know!

Thanks again for the comments.
 

Jim@sea

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If that Humminbird 30 was a Westerly at £4995 and you spent £4000 (new engine) on it you may have had a boat which was worth £8995 and that is assuming that you did the fibreglass work yourself. The advert says it was a 1979, In that year I was after a boat and have never heard of a Humminbird 30.
I bought a 1979 Moody 30 (wish I had her new) Try and find one now, I know a few years ago one was sold on Windemere for £6000.
At least with a Moody or a Westerly when you come to sell they are sought after.
 

Scotsailor

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I know we can’t tell very much from the photos as to the extent of the damage. But I’m not convinced that the internal joinery needs to be removed. … I’m thinking that the keel needs to be removed. The damaged section of the hull needs to be carefully cut out. Carefully shape the edge of the damaged area to a taper … then I think I would make a mould suitable to layup a replacement section for the damaged area. Fabricate the replacement hull section to fit exactly. Epoxy the new section in place. Re attach the keel … now I’m aware I am not a shipwright. But I can’t see why that wouldn’t be a good repair if done very accurately and carefully.
 

pvb

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I know we can’t tell very much from the photos as to the extent of the damage. But I’m not convinced that the internal joinery needs to be removed. … I’m thinking that the keel needs to be removed. The damaged section of the hull needs to be carefully cut out. Carefully shape the edge of the damaged area to a taper … then I think I would make a mould suitable to layup a replacement section for the damaged area. Fabricate the replacement hull section to fit exactly. Epoxy the new section in place. Re attach the keel … now I’m aware I am not a shipwright. But I can’t see why that wouldn’t be a good repair if done very accurately and carefully.
Have you ever done a DIY removal of a keel?
 

Stemar

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Any damage around the keel and I'd want to be looking carefully at the interior GRP reinforcing, box sections, stringers etc. They may be fine - it may just be localised damage, but I'd want to be sure.
 

Tranona

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I know we can’t tell very much from the photos as to the extent of the damage. But I’m not convinced that the internal joinery needs to be removed. … I’m thinking that the keel needs to be removed. The damaged section of the hull needs to be carefully cut out. Carefully shape the edge of the damaged area to a taper … then I think I would make a mould suitable to layup a replacement section for the damaged area. Fabricate the replacement hull section to fit exactly. Epoxy the new section in place. Re attach the keel … now I’m aware I am not a shipwright. But I can’t see why that wouldn’t be a good repair if done very accurately and carefully.
If you look at the interior photos (some of which actually show the keel bolts) the damaged portion is under the galley which is built in furniture. While the keel could be removed, the damage to the hull would need part of the galley and the floor to be cut away. The hull is what was conventional for the time, solid layup with top hat stringers. The concern to me would be why the hull failed so dramatically at that point, but i suspect the boat was dropped with the front corner of the keel hitting first.
 
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