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Inflate lifejacket before abandoning ship into the water?

capnsensible

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In uk waters, the effect of cold shock on jumping in can be very debilitating and seriously affect your judgment. Something to be aware of.


The link is American. But cold doesnt care.

There are a lot of posters who are very averse to training, for whatever reason. But short courses in fire fighting, sea survival and first aid certainly don't do any harm, in my opinion, in enabling your duty of care for your crew.

Neither does having a serviced liferaft, life jackets and fire extinguishers. Stand by for howls. 😀
 

Gary Fox

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To the OP, this post is not a criticism of your original question.
Nobody has yet mentioned putting the fire out before jumping in the sea...the idea of fighting a fire is fairly daunting, or even totally unthinkable, if you haven't had training.
In the OP's case, a firefighting course (resulting in an educated choice of serious extinguishers) would probably prevent the need for getting wet.

In my view the 3 nastiest hazards are, in order: The 3 F's.

Fire
Flooding
Falling in the Sea.

The RYA hardly mentions firefighting courses, but bangs on about sea survival ones. Of which a large proportion is about launching, righting and entering liferafts, which is very rare.
 

Athomson

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To the OP, this post is not a criticism of your original question.
Nobody has yet mentioned putting the fire out before jumping in the sea...the idea of fighting a fire is fairly daunting, or even totally unthinkable, if you haven't had training.
In the OP's case, a firefighting course (resulting in an educated choice of serious extinguishers) would probably prevent the need for getting wet.

In my view the 3 nastiest hazards are, in order: The 3 F's.

Fire
Flooding
Falling in the Sea.

The RYA hardly mentions firefighting courses, but bangs on about sea survival ones. Of which a large proportion is about launching, righting and entering liferafts, which is very rare.
I totally agree, question was assuming no choice but to jump for whatever reason.

These should be standard equipment but I've never seen one on any MAB i've been on Fire Port - Stainless Steel or White | Float Your Boat

1617787158702.png

Seems a fire in a small space should always be able to be put out if an extinguisher can be used without having to open a hatch allowing flames out and air in. But having to hold open a hatch with one hand while having to operate a fire extinguisher with the other 2 hands doesn't add up.
 

glynd

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....

Seems a fire in a small space should always be able to be put out if an extinguisher can be used without having to open a hatch allowing flames out and air in. But having to hold open a hatch with one hand while having to operate a fire extinguisher with the other 2 hands doesn't add up.
Well - an automated extinguisher is what you definitely want.

Not sure what you mean about "holding up a hatch" - any small boat engine bay will/should have a small diameter hole for you to poke an extra extinguisher through without allowing lots of lovely fire-friendly oxygen inside
 
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Athomson

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Not sure what you mean about "holding up a hatch" - any small boat engine bay will/should have a small diameter hold for you to poke an extra extinguisher through without allowing lots of lovely fire-friendly oxygen inside
I'm a strictly MAB sailor and never had one or seen one on other's boats (might not have looked hard enough). Next inboard engine boat will certainly have one or 2 though. I guess its not too hard to lift a companionway top step a bit to shove the nozzle in and pull the trigger but for that price its mad not to have a proper little port for the job.

I wonder if there will be a MAIB report to read on the conwy fire or are they only when there has been loss of life?
 

lustyd

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AWBs pretty much all have a hole, but I've never seen a fancy little flap that I'm aware of
 

lustyd

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Now I think about it, that flap would achieve nothing at all on most boats. Mine has two 4" ducts to bring fresh air in to the engine compartment from the stern!
 

JumbleDuck

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Now I think about it, that flap would achieve nothing at all on most boats. Mine has two 4" ducts to bring fresh air in to the engine compartment from the stern!
I think the idea is to keep noise and fumes out of the cabin.
 

lustyd

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Ah that makes sense, I thought it was to stop air getting to the fire :) For some reason I have no photos of the steps on my current boat so no idea what I have in terms of holes and flaps
 

penberth3

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......The RYA hardly mentions firefighting courses, but bangs on about sea survival ones. Of which a large proportion is about launching, righting and entering liferafts, which is very rare.
The thing to bang on about is fire prevention, not fire fighting. I'd guess there are very few "accidental" fires, and most are caused by neglect of something very simple.
 

Malo37

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Having spent my entire working life on or concerned with the sea and having completed many survival and firefighting courses I would make the following observations.
Only try to extinguish a fire if is is small, easily accessed and within the extinguishing capability of your equipment ie don't waste time trying to extinguish a big fire with a small extinguisher.
Entering the water should always be a last resort when other options become impossible. eg life raft, dinghy etc.
ALWAYS ensure your lifejacket is inflated before entering the water. Cold shock could render you incapable or even unconscious. Even if its an automatic inflation model, trigger the inflation manually just before entering the water. (you never know - the auto function may not work)
At least know how to launch and right a life raft or preferably go on a one day course. Quite important as sods law says your life raft is going to inflate upside down.
 

capnsensible

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From an RYA point of view, fire precautions and firefighting are a complete section on the competent crew course. Obviously, not everyone who sails does that course but it's a topic that's important in a safety brief. Schools are obliged to,give a credible one and forms part of the training for skippers courses.

The vessels are coded so must carry the correct fire extinguishers, clearly available and in date. The crew must be shown how to operate them. This includes the mandatory engine compartment extinguisher or the means of injecting the medium into the engine compartment. Which is often an access hole covered by a movable plate or bung.

A fire blanket is required for the galley area and smoke detectors in all cabins. Which some may consider ott, but this is commercial.

For those of us like the poster above who have had firefighting training for seafarers, the process is quite logical. But if you've never been confronted with what might happen, it's gonna be scary and a bit of a nightmare. Not saying everyone's got to rush out and be a fireman tomorrow, but there's plenty of Google help to get people thinking, as skipper, what you are gonna do.

I was taught to get stuck in and put it out early as possible. And to guard against re ignition. It's a very rare thing, but I personally prefer to be prepared.
 

greeny

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You should try watching fibre glass burn some time! If a GRP boat is on fire, put it out or don't be on the boat
And? What is your point. I think I said I was getting off the boat didn't I? Why do you have to try to turn everything into an arguement on here? Chill out. You won't get one from me. Bye.
P.S. I have seen fibre glass burn and been in some fairly major fire and abandonment scenarios in the oil and gas industry. I base my comments on the training and experience I received from professionals.
 
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greeny

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Having spent my entire working life on or concerned with the sea and having completed many survival and firefighting courses I would make the following observations.
Only try to extinguish a fire if is is small, easily accessed and within the extinguishing capability of your equipment ie don't waste time trying to extinguish a big fire with a small extinguisher.
Entering the water should always be a last resort when other options become impossible. eg life raft, dinghy etc.
ALWAYS ensure your lifejacket is inflated before entering the water. Cold shock could render you incapable or even unconscious. Even if its an automatic inflation model, trigger the inflation manually just before entering the water. (you never know - the auto function may not work)
At least know how to launch and right a life raft or preferably go on a one day course. Quite important as sods law says your life raft is going to inflate upside down.
100 % agree. We've probably attended the same courses over the years. :)
 

lustyd

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And? What is your point. I think I said I was getting off the boat didn't I? Why do you have to try to turn everything into an arguement on here? Chill out. You won't get one from me. Bye.
P.S. I have seen fibre glass burn and been in some fairly major fire scenarios in the oil and gas industry. I base my comments on the training and experience I received from professionals.
I wasn't trying to start an argument, simply pointing out that you almost certainly don't have time on a GRP boat because it burns exceptionally fast once alight.
 

capnsensible

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I once witnessed the sad sight of a yacht at anchor burning to the waterline and sinking. The huge clouds of thick, black toxic fumes that are given off are a biiiig hazard. Same as any land fire from other materials....I think maybe more people suffocate than get burnt?

The yacht was a charter boat. They clients had a BBQ on it then gone ashore. Didn't check. Endex holiday and security deposit. Local fire brigade wouldn't go near it and let nature take its course. Horrible mess in Caribean waters.
 

lustyd

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Got to be extremely careful with BBQs if they're charcoal as when up to temp it'll fizz on the surface and tends to be drawn towards the boat by surface tension. Never throw coals over the side until completely cold!
 
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