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Definition of a motorsailer?

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How do you define a motorsailer? Once it was easy, when most of the world was divided between Nauticat/Fisher style of yachts and "the others". But now? Deck saloon? Wheel shelter? Hallberg-Rassy-type windscreens? Huge engine? A Swedish insurance company says; if the engine power in HP is more than the sailarea in sq. metres, it´s a motorsailer. Your opinion!?
 
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The ultimate compromise between everything! But at the end of the day they don't sail that well, motor that well, handle that well... dont sit on the fence! Either go for a sleek powerful motorcruiser or a smooth slippery yacht!!!

But I have to say, when I walk past a fisher, it would be my next choice... after the above!
 
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Interesting definition, but....

...I think most Hallberg-Rassy´s, Najad´s and similar cruisers have a sheltered steering position and huge tankage and they will probably motor faster than with sail in a F 5, if not in all points of wind. Are these really motorsailers? On the other hand, a Hunter Pilot 27, does she really have tankage of this size? I doubt she´ll motor faster in a headwind than under sail (or do you mean VMG?) In such case she would´nt be a motorsailer.
 
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Dry Trousers

HR's, Nadgers, etc are not motor sailers according to my definition above. While they have windscreens they don't put a proper hard roof over the helmsperson's head. Nor would you drive one in breezy weather without being oilskinned (N. Europe!) Nor could you perch your dry rump on a dry, upholstered seat.

And every HR I've ever sailed (two!) would certainly sail better than it would motor in a F5.

I think I understand where you are coming from with the question - what is the new(ish) breed of hybrid deck saloon yacht, a motorsailer or a proper sailboat? But why does it have to be one or t'other. A 'Deck Saloon Yacht" is as easy a categorisation to grasp and understand as a 'proper' motorsailer or a 'proper' yacht. Not everythinjg needs to fall into one of those two categories.

Viva diversity.
 
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Its not the boat - its a state of mind . . .

If I cant make a SOG of 5 knots, then the engine goes on. Or VMG of 4 knots, then the engine goes on and I head to wind. Hence I am a Motorsailor!
 
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Re: Its not the boat - its a state of mind . . .

You are quite right,in this day and age unless blue water cruising virtually everyone I know whether cruiser racer or true cruising owner uses engine when speed drops below their own x figure,my own figure is generally 5kts. If however you are out for a few hours day sail two or three knots ,so what,no hurry.
 
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I've just spent most of the day on the deck, in the marina, in a freezing cold F6 Northerly wind.

I don't care how it's defined - I want one
 
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Maybe the answer lies with the owner rather than the boat. If you crank up the motor at the drop of a hat, to get in before the pubs close or to minimize discomfort in lousy conditions, or your preferred storm rig is double reefed main and the engine at full revs, you are a motorsailer. If you sail for sailings sake you are a sailer. Both are sailors.
 
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You guys are on the wrong web-site - try Motor Boat & Yachting (nm)

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Perhaps a simpler definition is performance around the old name 50/50(power or sail) with dry warm steering position.
 
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I agree, to some extent, but in my opinion you are talking about the traditional motorsailers, like the Fisher´s and similar. Of course these MFV-types are nothing less than real motorsailers, like them or not. My issue was not to argue about the benefits or weaknesses of these yachts. Rather, what happens when you take a true, modern sailing hull, put an deck saloon on top of it with an internal, second steering position and fit a bigger engine? You´ll probably have a yacht that sails almost as good as her true sailing relatives and be able to motor well under most conditions, like any good displacing motor cruiser. Are they motorsailers? There are oceans of differences between a Eclipse 33 and a Nauticat 33. I´ve even seen people regard some of the Hallberg Rassy´s as motorsailers as well. So, where to draw the line between sailers and motorsailers?
 
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3 criteria maybe:

€ Sheltered steering position

€ Will motor faster than it will sail in a F5

€ Big enough fuel tanks to allow extended voyages to be made without help from sails - say fuel for 72 hours
 
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There are very few 'true' motor sailers about. A lot of them are bastardisations cobbled together. Dreamed up by a fanciful idea by usually taking the worst features and coming up with something that can't do anything very well. A real motor sailer will look right and feel right. It should do the job properly of conveying you at the pace you desire, in the direction you want and with a certain modicome of comfort. You are neither lying heeled over on you ear or being tossed about.

Many 'motorsailers' also suffer from a distinct lack of manouverability in tight situations, often because the rudder is too small or there is too much windage with high sides creating a very boxy look.

It is widely acknowledged that the wind is more often than not blowing against you than with you, so it is rather pleasant to be able to make good steady progress in the direction you want to go with a maximum heel of about 10 degrees. Everything then remains functional and most importantly the crew are happy - especially the wife!

But in the end up it really is down to what suits you best. You might like sailing your gunwale under all the time or you may like being tossed about because you have no sails to steady you. You might even enjoy being cold and wet all the time, but how long will your crew endure it.

Gus
 
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Cant say I go for the sail or bust types

The other good reason for loafing along is if you are trailing a mackerel line. Though Ive caught a couple of them when doing 6knots through the water going past the Casquets!
 
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Another way to stay warm and enjoy dry trousers ...buy a junk of the Galway Blazer/ Jetser style. NM

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