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Crossing the Irish Sea

Praxinoscope

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Aberaeron
Does anyone know if there are any clear and new rules now in force concerning sailing across the Irish Sea to the Irish Republic, now that Brexit has descended upon us?
Assuming that one day we shall be able to look back on the Covid pandemic and resume a normal existence, I would rather like to go back to my occasional trip across to Arklow etc.
 

dgadee

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13 Oct 2010
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Does anyone know if there are any clear and new rules now in force concerning sailing across the Irish Sea to the Irish Republic, now that Brexit has descended upon us?
Assuming that one day we shall be able to look back on the Covid pandemic and resume a normal existence, I would rather like to go back to my occasional trip across to Arklow etc.
It is part of the common travel area so no problem about coming and going with yourself and your boat. Pets and customs are an issue these days. There appears to be plenty of information available on both of those issues.

Travelling with pets | Department of Agriculture, Environment and Rural Affairs

Moving goods into, out of, or through Northern Ireland
 

Praxinoscope

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I suspect you will be better served by seeing what is in place when its time to go.

IMHO thing will be different then.

Might see you there - got a date to do more exploring in Srangford Lough. :)
Hoping might just about get the boat in the water this year, will keep an eye ope for you.
 

kof

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8 May 2018
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Yes. Free movement (dating back to 1921) between UK/Ireland. You don't even need a passport but might, in the unlikely event you are asked, to prove your citizenship. I've used a driving license before.

Does that mean you can sail to Ireland without clearing in and out as with say France?
 

awol

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4 Jan 2005
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Me - Level 4 Edinburgh; Boat - in Level 4
I presume , despite the border in the Irish Sea, that a trip to Noriron does not permit duty-free. I was trying to differentiate 'tween north and south where I am surmising a passage plan may allow duty-free goods. My apologies if I offended but in my ignorance I know no other term to use other than "the Republic".
 

Irish Rover

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I presume , despite the border in the Irish Sea, that a trip to Noriron does not permit duty-free. I was trying to differentiate 'tween north and south where I am surmising a passage plan may allow duty-free goods. My apologies if I offended but in my ignorance I know no other term to use other than "the Republic".
No apology needed - the Irish constitution says the "name of the State is Éire, or, in the English language, Ireland"
 

Barnacle Bill

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County Kilkenny, Ireland
The Irish call it Ireland.
The country (in the south) is The Republic of Ireland, the island is Ireland. Eire is the Irish language name for the island.

The first time I sailed to Crosshaven from UK, I was all set to declare our arrival to the local Garda station as advised by the Nautical Almanac and pilot book, so I went up there and found it was closed. So we kind of forgot about it, till a day or so later it was open. Very conscious of my skipper's duties, I duly went in and announced our arrival, time and date, name of vessel, number of crew etc - until I noticed he was looking totally bemused. There was a long pause. "Well" he said, and paused again. "Do you have any drugs on board?" I assured him we didn't - nothing was written down, and there were no formalities whatever.

Since bringing my boat permanently to Ireland in 2008 nobody has at any point asked me any questions about who I am, where I'm going or where I've been, and I stopped flying an ensign. My bet is, Brexit will make little or no difference to this happy state of affairs.
 

Halo

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Wetherby
Like Barnacle Bill I have been over the water to Ireland on and off since 1985 and have never been asked any questions by the authorities.
Hopefully peole will not try and go over there until the UK has got CV19 under a lot more control.
 

dgadee

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Getting duty free is surely possible in theory. But who would provide it is the practical difficulty. I remember I used to go to Cherbourg and bring back a case of wine in the early 1980s - with 5 on a 30 footer (those were the days) the cases took up the cabin floor. Things were organised - they brought the duty free down to the pontoon. I can't really see there being the same amount of business for yachts crossing the Irish Sea. Ferries, yes.
 

kof

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8 May 2018
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Duty free BACKKK! But only from mainland UK and not N.I.
Brexit: Duty-free makes a come-back for travellers returning from Britain (irishtimes.com)

Getting duty free is surely possible in theory. But who would provide it is the practical difficulty. I remember I used to go to Cherbourg and bring back a case of wine in the early 1980s - with 5 on a 30 footer (those were the days) the cases took up the cabin floor. Things were organised - they brought the duty free down to the pontoon. I can't really see there being the same amount of business for yachts crossing the Irish Sea. Ferries, yes.
 

graham

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16 May 2001
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7,799
I remember crossing to Ireland during the foot and mouth epidemic. The Irish coastguard where sending out regular long winded messages on VHF that all uk vessels including yachts were to report to the harbour master and sign a declaration that you had not sailed through any farms .

On arrival the harbour master informed me that he hadn't received any forms so dont worry too much.

This was quite a major port with fishing vessels and yachts from all over europe.

.Hopefully the Irish will continue to give us a warm and helpful welcome as before.
 

Irish Rover

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The country (in the south) is The Republic of Ireland, the island is Ireland. Eire is the Irish language name for the island.
Not entirely correct, See #11 and to make it slightly more complicated a law passed in 1949 which changed our relationship with the Commonwealth says "It is hereby declared that the description of the State shall be the Republic of Ireland." Confused. So are most Irish people but then many Brits don't know the difference between the UK and GB [although Brexit has helped to inform a few more].
 

tyce

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6 Jan 2004
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cumbria
It will be interesting to see how bothered they are about bringing dogs over from England, as a dog owner if I have to go enter through an official route i.e. ferry port then I will give it a miss and head to Scotland instead.
 
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kof

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8 May 2018
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103
99+% of us Paddys never use the name Eire to refer to Ireland - that's usually only used by our fellow British cousins. It's almost always "Ireland". Not that we care mind you. Call us anything you want so long as you spend lots of money over here.

Not entirely correct, See #11 and to make it slightly more complicated a law passed in 1949 which changed our relationship with the Commonwealth says "It is hereby declared that the description of the State shall be the Republic of Ireland." Confused. So are most Irish people but then many Brits don't know the difference between the UK and GB [although Brexit has helped to inform a few more].
 
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