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Courier "Lost" my sail

Bru

Well-known member
Joined
17 Jan 2007
Messages
13,310
You're all missing the point.

These companies call themselves courier services but they aren't

I explained the difference above, it's not a play on words
 

JBJag27

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Joined
13 Jun 2016
Messages
2,354
You're all missing the point.

These companies call themselves courier services but they aren't

I explained the difference above, it's not a play on words
Do you work for RM? It's the sort of distinction my dad used to fret about.. ;)
 

NorthRising

Active member
Joined
30 Mar 2009
Messages
301
Location
North - Sonata
You need to constantly read Hermes Terms and Conditions and their Insurance Conditions. Currently I am suing them for over £600 for insurance I paid for parcels that were covered when I first started using them 5 years ago, however they continually change their T&C's without any notification. You are expected to check them everytime you dispatch. They continually change their insurance terms without any notice and cannot inform me when a subtle change made my parcels excluded from their insurance. When declaring the parcel contents their software does not stop ineligible items from taking out insurance and allow you to assuming they are insured. The claim was all triggered by them delivering a parcel worth only £24 to a wrong address. Insurance was paid as the free limit was £20 and they said the contents of the parcel were excluded and refused to pay a penny. Luckily I could replace the item with a similar one I had in stock and the customer was happy, if not I would have had to refund the customer. Due to Covid19 the case should have been heard on 22 April and currently awaiting a revised court date. So you have been warned about Hermes, so I hope londonpiper did not use Hermes as he may be completely out of pocket.
The lost an antenna sent to melate last year, but in that case it was my suppliers problem, and they despatched another one, but in many years that is the only thing I've had gone completely AWOL; so the name Hermes sets alarm bells ringing for me.
 

JumbleDuck

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Joined
8 Aug 2013
Messages
22,257
Location
SW Scotland
You're all missing the point.

These companies call themselves courier services but they aren't

I explained the difference above, it's not a play on words
Less a play on words, more different people using different definitions. Anybody, everybody knows that couriers are people who fly internationally taking important documents as theeir hand luggage. Certainly not a bloke wih a transit.
 

Bru

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Joined
17 Jan 2007
Messages
13,310
Less a play on words, more different people using different definitions. Anybody, everybody knows that couriers are people who fly internationally taking important documents as theeir hand luggage. Certainly not a bloke wih a transit.
courier
noun [ C ]
UK /ˈkʊr.i.ər/ US /ˈkʊr.i.ɚ/
courier noun [C] (MESSENGER)

a person or company that takes messages, letters, or parcels from one person or place to another:
 

JumbleDuck

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Joined
8 Aug 2013
Messages
22,257
Location
SW Scotland
courier
noun [ C ]
UK /ˈkʊr.i.ər/ US /ˈkʊr.i.ɚ/
courier noun [C] (MESSENGER)

a person or company that takes messages, letters, or parcels from one person or place to another:
Yes, just like Hermes or Parcelforce. What do you call a person or company that takes messages, letters, or parcels from one person or place and back to the same person or place?
 

JumbleDuck

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Joined
8 Aug 2013
Messages
22,257
Location
SW Scotland
In that definition, all delivery drivers could be called couriers so, why do you keep insisting they're not?
I'm a traveller, you're a tourist, they're holiday makers. I'm courier, you're a parcel delivery service operative, he's a man with a van.
 

JBJag27

Well-known member
Joined
13 Jun 2016
Messages
2,354
From a strict etymological perspective a courier would have to actually run wouldn't they?
 

prv

Well-known member
Joined
29 Nov 2009
Messages
36,620
Location
Southampton
There was a report a couple of weeks on TV of a company that looses an amazing amount of stuff sent via Hermes and lots of it was found in an auction house still with the labels on. Clearly a problem with their drivers nicking stuff and passing it on.
From what I remember it wasn’t the drivers individually stealing and eBaying packages, but the company incorrectly invoking its “sell off unidentifiable packages lost in the system” process.

It’s reasonable for them to have a system for disposing of material that’s got lost in trucks and warehouses, fallen out of damaged boxes, become separated from its tracking label, and can’t be delivered to either the recipient or the sender. Any large network’s inevitably going to have a bit of that. The fraud was that the company was directing large numbers of packages down that route that were recently sent, intact, and still had barcodes and addresses clearly marked on them.

Pete
 

Bru

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Joined
17 Jan 2007
Messages
13,310
Yes, just like Hermes or Parcelforce. What do you call a person or company that takes messages, letters, or parcels from one person or place and back to the same person or place?
You're being obtuse

The POINT is that a genuine courier takes your consignment, and (normally) only your consignment from you directly to where you want it to go (usually the same day). Couriers take considerable care over customer's consignments, loss or damage is not acceptable nor is failing to make a delivery

Parcels companies, including Hermes, pick your consignment up and chuck it loose in the back of a van along with dozens of other parcels. Then they chuck it around a few more times, involving at least two transhipments, before sending it out on a multi-drop delivery run. Losses and damages are inevitable and it is expected and anticipated that not all deliveries will be made on time

Shipping goods by parcel company is cheap. Using a courier not so cheap (but not as expensive as you might think)

If you're shipping a high value, delicate and / or important item (be it anything from an envelope to a pallet) then using a genuine courier beats using a parcels company (even if they like to call themselves a courier company) hands down.
 

Laysula

Well-known member
Joined
1 Jun 2008
Messages
1,308
Location
Brixham
Just had an e-mail from a company that I have bought a polishing machine off to say that My Hermes has lost it and they are resending it on Tuesday.
 

JumbleDuck

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Joined
8 Aug 2013
Messages
22,257
Location
SW Scotland
The POINT is that a genuine courier takes your consignment, and (normally) only your consignment from you directly to where you want it to go (usually the same day).
Only by your eccentric and obsolete definition.

 

Bru

Well-known member
Joined
17 Jan 2007
Messages
13,310
Only by your eccentric and obsolete definition.
Do you by any chance have an interest in a parcels company?

The difference between overnight parcels services and couriers is clearly understood in the light haulage industry and is neither eccentric nor obsolete
 

JBJag27

Well-known member
Joined
13 Jun 2016
Messages
2,354
Do you by any chance have an interest in a parcels company?

The difference between overnight parcels services and couriers is clearly understood in the light haulage industry and is neither eccentric nor obsolete
I'm with you, a real courier should run with the package.
 
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