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Corribee - coromandel

cirruss

New member
Joined
23 Jan 2017
Messages
10
Hello!

Just a quick check, I have been looking for a 30ft family boat (living near blacksea) and saw one of these and never considered something so small though I have been quite taken by her seaworthiness and ability.

My family is two adults and two young teenagers, would this not bee too small to accommodate us for nice day sails?
 

LittleSister

Well-known member
Joined
12 Nov 2007
Messages
12,001
Location
Me Norwich - Boat Orwell & Southwold
Ok for family day sailing - only just perhaps maybe. Few families today would, I think, find them big enough for comfortable overnighting, especially with teenagers, rather than younger kids.

The Corribee is very tight inside by modern standards - not much headroom at all. I think later versions had a slightly higher cabin top, but only marginally so. The toilet arrangements, too, would probably not find favour with any but the most adventurous families.

The Coromandel was same hull but a more voluminous top on it, and a junk rig (generally speaking, very easy to handle, not so close-winded as the more conventional bermuda rig). (I have a vague recollection it's only 3 berth, too, to make room for a separate heads compartment.)

A good, seaworthy hull, and pretty (and I've seriously considered both for my own use in the past), but I think for your particular purposes you could find something better suited. Remember that an increase in length effectively extends the middle, rather than ends, of the boat. So a 30 foot boat is vastly more spacious (and expensive to run!) than a Corribee. Even a 26 footer is a big jump from a Corribee or Coromandel.

p.s. Where is blacksea? (I assume UK, not THE Black Sea.)
 
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cirruss

New member
Joined
23 Jan 2017
Messages
10
Ok for family day sailing - only just perhaps maybe. Few families today would, I think, find them big enough for comfortable overnighting, especially with teenagers, rather than younger kids.

The Corribee is very tight inside by modern standards - not much headroom at all. I think later versions had a slightly higher cabin top, but only marginally so. The toilet arrangements, too, would probably not find favour with any but the most adventurous families.

The Coromandel was same hull but a more voluminous top on it, and a junk rig (generally speaking, very easy to handle, not so close-winded as the more conventional bermuda rig). (I have a vague recollection it's only 3 berth, too, to make room for a separate heads compartment.)

A good, seaworthy hull, and pretty (and I've seriously considered both for my own use in the past), but I think for your particular purposes you could find something better suited. Remember that an increase in length effectively extends the middle, rather than ends, of the boat. So a 30 foot boat is vastly more spacious (and expensive to run!) than a Corribee. Even a 26 footer is a big jump from a Corribee or Coromandel.

p.s. Where is blacksea? (I assume UK, not THE Black Sea.)
Thankyou!

I am living in Bucharest, so east coast here of Romania being the black sea!
 

cirruss

New member
Joined
23 Jan 2017
Messages
10
Ok for family day sailing - only just perhaps maybe. Few families today would, I think, find them big enough for comfortable overnighting, especially with teenagers, rather than younger kids.

The Corribee is very tight inside by modern standards - not much headroom at all. I think later versions had a slightly higher cabin top, but only marginally so. The toilet arrangements, too, would probably not find favour with any but the most adventurous families.

The Coromandel was same hull but a more voluminous top on it, and a junk rig (generally speaking, very easy to handle, not so close-winded as the more conventional bermuda rig). (I have a vague recollection it's only 3 berth, too, to make room for a separate heads compartment.)

A good, seaworthy hull, and pretty (and I've seriously considered both for my own use in the past), but I think for your particular purposes you could find something better suited. Remember that an increase in length effectively extends the middle, rather than ends, of the boat. So a 30 foot boat is vastly more spacious (and expensive to run!) than a Corribee. Even a 26 footer is a big jump from a Corribee or Coromandel.

p.s. Where is blacksea? (I assume UK, not THE Black Sea.)
We are used to albin vega, maxi 77 before so I think this would be challenging tho8gh I think possible. I think rotating people inside to out would be key to success. I wonder if it could though safely take the weight of two adults and two teenagers? Not sure maximum load stats, will tey to look.
 

Corribee Boy

Well-known member
Joined
5 Jun 2011
Messages
1,308
Location
Bath / Wrabness
As you might guess, I own a Corribee,

As far as your use goes on the Black Sea, think little Sister has summed it up rather well, and there's not much more to add!

However I'd point out that the position of the rudder means the tiller is relatively far forward and 'sweeps' the cockpit so while it would be possible to seat four people, manoeuvring / tacking would be difficult, and your waterline might be a bit unbalanced!
 

dutyhog

Member
Joined
13 May 2009
Messages
180
Location
Argyll, Scotland
When we launched our self-build Corribee in 1973 at Rhu we had 13 people (plus bottles) on board for a few minutes. The sea was only just coming into the cockpit drains. So they can take some weight for a while.
 

V1701

Well-known member
Joined
1 Oct 2009
Messages
3,650
Location
South Coast UK
If it's for four and everyone can't sit in the cockpit without getting in the way then I'd go bigger if you can. I have an old (1969) Bowman 26, something like that that would be ok for four day sailing with the odd overnight/weekend also doable...
 

LittleSister

Well-known member
Joined
12 Nov 2007
Messages
12,001
Location
Me Norwich - Boat Orwell & Southwold
Having thought further about it, I think your family members would be more likely to want to keep going out sailing if you chose a larger boat.

Something 26-30 foot, with lounging space and a separate toilet compartment, would be more comfortable in many ways and, I'm sure, be much more likely to find favour with them. It's often the case that the rest of the family turns out less keen, anyway, but a boat of this size could be easily sailed single-handed or two-up.
 

Mataji

Active member
Joined
3 Jul 2012
Messages
326
Location
Plymouth
I loved sailing my Corribee (see profile picture). However, 4 people in the cockpit would be too many. 3 adults was the limit, even then we risked getting wet feet. Teenagers tend to keep growing and getting heavier, I’d look for something a bit bigger.
Achilles maybe? Similar to Corribee but that bit bigger.
 

alancollins

Member
Joined
28 Mar 2008
Messages
181
A friend of mine used to go cruising with his wife, four children and a dog in a 22 foot Seamew , designed I think by Ian Proctor. They must have slept in shifts!
 

JumbleDuck

Well-known member
Joined
8 Aug 2013
Messages
22,530
Location
SW Scotland
JumbleDuck's Universal Rule of Boat Size: Everybody will tell you that the boat they sold was a bit too small and the boat they can't afford is a bit too big.

cf JumbleDuck's Universal Rule of Hi-Fi Enthusiasts: The sound stage only properly opens out at a price halfway between what you paid and what they paid.
 

Mark-1

Well-known member
Joined
22 Sep 2008
Messages
2,885
Hello!

Just a quick check, I have been looking for a 30ft family boat (living near blacksea) and saw one of these and never considered something so small though I have been quite taken by her seaworthiness and ability.

My family is two adults and two young teenagers, would this not bee too small to accommodate us for nice day sails?
I have a Corribee. Deffo too small to sensibly daysail with two adults and two teenage children unless you are all midgets IMHO.

I typically sail with a 4yo and an 8yo. Occasionally the wife comes and the extra body really becomes awkward.
 
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Mark-1

Well-known member
Joined
22 Sep 2008
Messages
2,885
A friend of mine used to go cruising with his wife, four children and a dog in a 22 foot Seamew , designed I think by Ian Proctor. They must have slept in shifts!
Sleeping four on the Corribee would be fine, the berths themselves are massive. As long as literally *all* you did was sleep. ....And nobody took a bag.
 

oldmanofthehills

Well-known member
Joined
13 Aug 2010
Messages
2,599
Location
Bristol / Cornwall
I loved sailing my Corribee (see profile picture). However, 4 people in the cockpit would be too many. 3 adults was the limit, even then we risked getting wet feet. Teenagers tend to keep growing and getting heavier, I’d look for something a bit bigger.
Achilles maybe? Similar to Corribee but that bit bigger.
Achilles 24 foot sail well but are notoriously narrow. Even the Achilles 9m (29foot) is unsuited for family cruising with awkward sleeping arrangements and a wierd galley. Fast, seaworthy and cramped - I was very tempted by one mind you as family grown so only 2 of us but my dear navigator reminded me we are only going to get less nimble and less able to stoop while moving about below decks
 
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