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Campingaz

sailorman

Well-known member
Joined
21 May 2003
Messages
78,204
Location
Here or there
The danger is not just from the risk of leaks but from overfilling a cylinder. There must be headspace in the cylinder to allow for expansion to avoid the risk of its bursting if the cylinder gets warm .
Post 3 item 12

hence weighing the cylinder as its filled ( digi suitcase scales ) all relevant weights stamped into the 907[/QUOTE]
 

Boathook

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Joined
5 Oct 2001
Messages
4,812
Location
Surrey & boat in Dorset. Both have pubs
The danger is not just from the risk of leaks but from overfilling a cylinder. There must be headspace in the cylinder to allow for expansion to avoid the risk of its bursting if the cylinder gets warm .
I use electronic scales to make sure that I don't over fill having first weighed the bottle empty. The filling is a slow process.
 

Old Crusty

Active member
Joined
28 Aug 2017
Messages
741
As men grow older, they do become resistant to safety rules and believe they are immortal. Having witnessed three boats explode due to gas and petrol leakage, not to mention the pub landlord who connected a 28lb cylinder of CO2 direct to a keg of beer (that destroyed his cellar and allowed the E services to scrape his remains into several body bags) I couldn't be bothered to put myself at that level of risk to save a few pounds. Quite bonkers. If you can afford a boat and need it, you can afford to buy cylinder gas from a retailer.

This is yet another example of would be Darwin Award seekers looking for glory and you may find, if you look, that it is unlawful. What might the MCA make of it? I'll see you at your inquest. Toot toot!
 

Time Out

Active member
Joined
19 Dec 2015
Messages
690
As men grow older, they do become resistant to safety rules and believe they are immortal. Having witnessed three boats explode due to gas and petrol leakage, not to mention the pub landlord who connected a 28lb cylinder of CO2 direct to a keg of beer (that destroyed his cellar and allowed the E services to scrape his remains into several body bags) I couldn't be bothered to put myself at that level of risk to save a few pounds. Quite bonkers. If you can afford a boat and need it, you can afford to buy cylinder gas from a retailer.

This is yet another example of would be Darwin Award seekers looking for glory and you may find, if you look, that it is unlawful. What might the MCA make of it? I'll see you at your inquest. Toot toot!
I’m with you.

There’s a reason why you pay for a service!!
 

Chris_d

Well-known member
Joined
15 Jun 2001
Messages
4,363
Location
Oxfordshire
As men grow older, they do become resistant to safety rules and believe they are immortal. Having witnessed three boats explode due to gas and petrol leakage, not to mention the pub landlord who connected a 28lb cylinder of CO2 direct to a keg of beer (that destroyed his cellar and allowed the E services to scrape his remains into several body bags) I couldn't be bothered to put myself at that level of risk to save a few pounds. Quite bonkers. If you can afford a boat and need it, you can afford to buy cylinder gas from a retailer.

This is yet another example of would be Darwin Award seekers looking for glory and you may find, if you look, that it is unlawful. What might the MCA make of it? I'll see you at your inquest. Toot toot!
Couldn't agree more, one of those camping gas cylinders lasts us about 2 years so £30 for a new one doesn't seem that bad. Must not be making enough cups of coffee .
 

sailorman

Well-known member
Joined
21 May 2003
Messages
78,204
Location
Here or there
As men grow older, they do become resistant to safety rules and believe they are immortal. Having witnessed three boats explode due to gas and petrol leakage, not to mention the pub landlord who connected a 28lb cylinder of CO2 direct to a keg of beer (that destroyed his cellar and allowed the E services to scrape his remains into several body bags) I couldn't be bothered to put myself at that level of risk to save a few pounds. Quite bonkers. If you can afford a boat and need it, you can afford to buy cylinder gas from a retailer.

This is yet another example of would be Darwin Award seekers looking for glory and you may find, if you look, that it is unlawful. What might the MCA make of it? I'll see you at your inquest. Toot toot!
some have grown up with PBO
 

Boathook

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Joined
5 Oct 2001
Messages
4,812
Location
Surrey & boat in Dorset. Both have pubs
Couldn't agree more, one of those camping gas cylinders lasts us about 2 years so £30 for a new one doesn't seem that bad. Must not be making enough cups of coffee .
I can get through a 4.5 kg calor bottle in a week on holiday. Last summer as it was fairly hot, a bottle lasted 2.5 weeks for all the cooking, hot water plus I have a gas fridge constantly on. I normally avoid marinas but when in one I do hook up to the mains electrics.
 

Parabordi

Active member
Joined
22 Apr 2011
Messages
386
I can get through a 4.5 kg calor bottle in a week on holiday. Last summer as it was fairly hot, a bottle lasted 2.5 weeks for all the cooking, hot water plus I have a gas fridge constantly on. I normally avoid marinas but when in one I do hook up to the mains electrics.
Same here, one a week with a gas fridge.
 

Chris_d

Well-known member
Joined
15 Jun 2001
Messages
4,363
Location
Oxfordshire
I can get through a 4.5 kg calor bottle in a week on holiday. Last summer as it was fairly hot, a bottle lasted 2.5 weeks for all the cooking, hot water plus I have a gas fridge constantly on. I normally avoid marinas but when in one I do hook up to the mains electrics.
Blimey! never trusted a gas fridge on a boat although just googled them and see there are loads, 12V fridge and hot water from engine does for us, agree never plug in on the river not many sockets on the riverbank :)
 

Boathook

Well-known member
Joined
5 Oct 2001
Messages
4,812
Location
Surrey & boat in Dorset. Both have pubs
Blimey! never trusted a gas fridge on a boat although just googled them and see there are loads, 12V fridge and hot water from engine does for us, agree never plug in on the river not many sockets on the riverbank :)
Its on a sea going boat (cat) and the fridge is good. It has a flame failure as standard and the flame is only like a pilot light. I don't have the power generating capacity for a compressor fridge to be run of the battery's. The solar panels only just cope with the electronics !
 
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