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Cabin of the Week

SimonKNZ

New member
Joined
7 Jan 2020
Messages
21
Location
Auckland NZ
Who was the skipper? I took a Nich 55 up the East coast of the USA as a visiting skipper for JSASTC but I did so many trips In various places I can’t remember all the crews I had!
I can’t remember his name now and the signature in my logbook is illegible. It was a visiting skipper and I remember we had a characterful young submariner as first mate (I was second mate). Good runs ashore in Baltimore and New York
 

john_morris_uk

Well-known member
Joined
3 Jul 2002
Messages
22,144
Location
Farnham, Surrey
The trip I took up the East Coast started in Bermuda. We sailed across to the USA and ended up in Little Creek, Norfolk Virginia. We then sailed up the intercostal waterway (losing the engine off its gearbox on the way which was mended by the Navy Agent in Annapolis) and then sailed to Boston via Baltimore, New York, and Rhode Island amongst other places. We swapped over with another crew in Boston and flew home. I remember having a few University Cadets on board together with some regulars from RAF and RN with some reservists. (One reservist girl was a PITA IIRC). It was a great trip though and mostly paid for by Her Majesty. (Thank you Ma'am.)
 

SimonKNZ

New member
Joined
7 Jan 2020
Messages
21
Location
Auckland NZ
The trip I took up the East Coast started in Bermuda. We sailed across to the USA and ended up in Little Creek, Norfolk Virginia. We then sailed up the intercostal waterway (losing the engine off its gearbox on the way which was mended by the Navy Agent in Annapolis) and then sailed to Boston via Baltimore, New York, and Rhode Island amongst other places. We swapped over with another crew in Boston and flew home. I remember having a few University Cadets on board together with some regulars from RAF and RN with some reservists. (One reservist girl was a PITA IIRC). It was a great trip though and mostly paid for by Her Majesty. (Thank you Ma'am.)
Mine was a shorter trip - Charleston SC to New York via Annapolis, Baltimore and Cape May.
One the subject of cabins and design, I remember the skipper joking that every possible spot around the cockpit where you would be able to lean back and relax had been fitted with a cleat or similar - they weren’t comfortable boats. I also remember the importance of securing the sails properly in the forward cabin - one boat had had some sails fall against the inward-opening watertight door which made it impossible to open. Good to know that Kukri is still at sea
 

Kukri

Well-known member
Joined
23 Jul 2008
Messages
11,830
Location
East coast UK. Mostly. Sometimes the Philippines
Good to see such a practical interior; plenty of handholds, deep fiddles, s/s worktops.
(y)
Apart from the abolition of the port leaf of the table, since we no longer need to feed a dozen at a sitting, and it was very much in the way, and the imminent replacement of the WC with a Blake Victory, I don’t feel a need to change much. She’s jolly comfortable for a crew of two to six.
 
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steve yates

Well-known member
Joined
16 Oct 2014
Messages
2,142
Location
Benfleet, Essex/Keswick, Cumbria
The view through the companionway of my bradwell 18 cabin, sailing her back round galloway to the solway firth in March 2017. Its a different world in the longbow :) I'm currently doing her up a wee bit at the moment, will come back and post another pic of the mark 2 version sometime.
 

Attachments

BenMurphy

New member
Joined
7 Jan 2020
Messages
26
Location
Cardiff Bay
The view through the companionway of my bradwell 18 cabin, sailing her back round galloway to the solway firth in March 2017. Its a different world in the longbow :) I'm currently doing her up a wee bit at the moment, will come back and post another pic of the mark 2 version sometime.
Certainly looks cosy! How does she handle in less-than-perfect conditions?
 

steve yates

Well-known member
Joined
16 Oct 2014
Messages
2,142
Location
Benfleet, Essex/Keswick, Cumbria
Surprisingly well if reefed down and some rolls in the genny. I actually like the roller reefing as I can set the mainsail to whatever size I wish. I've been out in waves where I couldn't see the horizon between them when in the trough and the sails lost the wind.
Force 6 is the blowsiest I've had her out, or would want to. And in both cases where it ended up blowing 6 rather than gusting, I had turned around and was running for shelter with my tail between my legs :) She's not a tender boat at all, no tipping when you walk on the side decks. I would sit in port if it was forecast force 5 and I would be going upwind. I would probably sail if it was downwindish. The sea state would bother me more than the wind strength to be honest. 2m waves forecast I don't go anywhere.

She was in seas so big off The Rhinns of Galloway, they bent her mild steel rudder, but until that point, she was handling them beautifully, and I felt very safe and was really enjoying the ride.
 
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