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Boat transport

welkman

New member
Joined
21 Jan 2008
Messages
81
Location
Essex UK
Hi again,

Does anyone know if it is possible to hire a road trailer suitable for a Contessa 26?

Thanks

James
 

Fascadale

Well-known member
Joined
15 Jan 2007
Messages
1,403
Location
One end of the A1
So have you bought one?
If so, that was quick.

There used to be an ad here for a CO26 trailer for hire.

There is one for sale on that site, or try emailing the secretary of the CO26 assoc. S/He may know of one for hire

Good luck
 

welkman

New member
Joined
21 Jan 2008
Messages
81
Location
Essex UK
No not purchased yet! However I am viewing one next week. I wanted to know about the trailer situation as it is about 300 miles from where I live straight across the country!

James
 
G

Guest

Guest
[ QUOTE ]
You could always sail round the country: it's what boats are for.

[/ QUOTE ]

Take a boat you've just purchased straight out to sea ?
 

Endeavourquay

New member
Joined
29 Aug 2007
Messages
218
Location
Gosport
Speak to Alan Piper, pm me For number, I have a cradle that fits on the low loader but I believe theres a boat sitting on it at the moment.
 

NickiCrutchfield

New member
Joined
7 Mar 2005
Messages
677
She has to go out sometime or other. Might as well be the journey home. Of course not always possible.
Nicki
 

FullCircle

Active member
Joined
19 Nov 2003
Messages
28,205
Dale Barrett. TEL. 07836 665802. of Burnham On Crouch, very well respected, also reasonable costs.

Moved my Jouet for me.
 

Noddy

Member
Joined
22 Jun 2005
Messages
621
Location
Thames Estuary
[ QUOTE ]
[ QUOTE ]
You could always sail round the country: it's what boats are for.

[/ QUOTE ]

Take a boat you've just purchased straight out to sea ?

[/ QUOTE ]

Maybe not transatlantic, but he will have had a good look at the thing before buying it.

So Yes! The sooner the better.
 
G

Guest

Guest
[ QUOTE ]
[ QUOTE ]
[ QUOTE ]
You could always sail round the country: it's what boats are for.

[/ QUOTE ]

Take a boat you've just purchased straight out to sea ?

[/ QUOTE ]

Maybe not transatlantic ...

[/ QUOTE ]

Do you hold the belief that sailing halfway around the British Isles is inherently safer, or less demanding on a boat and it's gear than crossing the Atlantic ?

Colin
 

Noddy

Member
Joined
22 Jun 2005
Messages
621
Location
Thames Estuary
I think thats a good point Colin. I suspect that the coastal passage you describe is potentially quite exciting.

Both types of passage have their dangers of course. Many have said that offshore is safer and I would agree. My comments were in the context of a new boat. Its not a big complicated boat, he will have had a good look at it, maybe even a survey, and its reputation is pretty good. Its mainly about the bail out options and the availability of rescue. (yes I agree with Roger's self sufficiency argument)

My thinking is that: If the mast falls down and you start making water off Brightlingsea, there is some danger. But essentially you are just having a bad day. The same thing happening mid ocean seems much more serious.

On the other hand there is more to bump into and more traffic near the coast. Much more complex.

I guess you have to make your own judgement based on the info available. Me? I would sail it round if I could get the time. I'd want to live with it for a bit and do some preparation before setting out into the wild blue yonder.

But this caution could be down to my lack of ocean experience. Maybe after the Azores I'll take up canal boats.

Cheers
Paul
 
G

Guest

Guest
[ QUOTE ]
I guess you have to make your own judgement based on the info available. Me? I would sail it round if I could get the time. I'd want to live with it for a bit and do some preparation before setting out into the wild blue yonder.

[/ QUOTE ]

Yes - I fully agree about the 'preparation first', and that's the main sticking point here - the boat and it's new owner would be 300 miles apart during the preparation - and that's a helluva commute to do a few jobs !

In my experience, one problem with secondhand boats is that they sometimes have hidden faults that not even a careful visual inspection reveals. The kinds of things I've found in the past are: a steel kick-up rudder blade rotted out and about to fail (steel tissue-thin *within* the stock - well hidden from view); through-hull valves made of brass, and just about ready to fall apart - again, not obvious from a visual inspection; and fatigue-cracked mast fittings, not at all obvious from the deck. Once I even found a temporary grp repair made (with plastic padding, between tides, I wouldn't wonder ..) below the waterline which was well disguised under anti-fouling. The damned patch gave way with a bit of serious prodding when the anti-foul was being stripped-off.

Maybe I'm a worry-puss but I do like to know what I'm letting myself in for with any newly-acquired boat - some sellers have been meticulous about maintenance, some are very close to being crooks. "Caveat emptor" indeed.

All-in-all I'd say transport this size of boat by road - it's a damned sight quicker and there's no chance of any unexpected dramas - then do the fullest of inspections carefully and thoroughly in your own back-yard, and in your own time.

Just my opinion.

'best
Colin
 

Noddy

Member
Joined
22 Jun 2005
Messages
621
Location
Thames Estuary
I've never had a new boat, so in my book all boats have hidden manky bits (new ones too I'll bet).

I have a friend who sails a homebuilt concrete gaffer with telegraph poles for masts, which he built himself. He is confident sailing around the North Sea.

I have another friend who has a relatively new plastic boat, on which he has spent a lot of time and money making sure that nothing will go wrong. He is low in confidence, rarely leaves the estuary and often has little 'dramas.'

I think the key difference between them is in their attitude to things going wrong or breaking: The guy with the concrete gaffer built it himself, expects some problems, and is confident in his ability to fix / jury rig most problems. The guy with the plastic boat looks after his boat so that nothing will go wrong. Yet things do, and his confidence is low.

I am trying to emulate concrete gaffer man, seems best to me, for both ocean sailing and coastal trips.

Nothing wrong with being a 'worry - puss' Colin. Just don't go to some of the 'experts' asking for advice because it will most likely cost you money and what you really wanted in the first place was reassurance!

Me? Tight? Nooo!

Paul
 
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