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Acute illness

lumphammer

Member
Joined
21 Aug 2003
Messages
411
Location
Chichester
I have just come out of hospital after surgery for a burst appendix that showed its first symptoms on Fri evening. I was operated on on Tues eve, and was told that if I had waited till Wed I might have been in septic shock needing intensive.

This all happened two weeks before I was due to set off on a proving trip to Southern Ireland.

It brought home to me how vulnerable we are to illness or accident on long distance trips, especially singlehanded.

Does anyone else stay awake at night worrying about what might happen?
 

Twisterowner

New member
Joined
23 Jul 2005
Messages
6,876
[ QUOTE ]
Does anyone else stay awake at night worrying about what might happen?



[/ QUOTE ]

No! I often worry about things that are happening but rarely about things that might.
 

CPD

Active member
Joined
20 Sep 2006
Messages
2,902
Location
Hampshire
Firstly, I'm sure we all hope you are well on the mend. Secondly, it is a very interesting point you make. I personally would put that scenario in the pot with the many many other "what ifs" we could all possibly face. It is easy to say, but I would like to think that if any of us were struck down with something, then we would exercise judgement, and if it got to the stage where something was clearly very very wrong, then EPIRB's and pan/pan/mayday could come into the frame. Easy to say I know, but I think if an truly obvjective analysis were made of it, then we wouldn't go. Thats not to say that by doing so we are being irresponsible, more that it is yet another factor that we have to get "into perspective" Having said all that, in your current case, it is highly likely that, mid-ocean, you would indeed have suffered far more than you already, Im sure, have. I dont stay awake thinking about it, but put it in that box of situations that may well have to be dealt with, for the first time, at night, in a storm. . . . . etc etc. Stop worrying about it, get yourself sorted, and get back out on the water asap. get well soon.
 

Noddy

Member
Joined
22 Jun 2005
Messages
621
Location
Thames Estuary
Re: Acute illness - Fear

I DO NOT MEAN ANY OFFENCE BY THIS!!
(and I strongly disagree with his definition of "Coward" and "Valiant." However: /forums/images/graemlins/smile.gif

Cowards die many times before their deaths;
The valiant never taste of death but once.

Julius Caesar II, Shakespeare


I suspect that waiting in the trenches to go over the top was probably worse than actually doing it.

I used to fly microlights and worry about , and prepare for, engine faliures on every flight. It was a blessed relief when it actually stopped and I could concentrate on getting us down safely. (no pain in this situation though).

I suspect it will be fine, or even a relief, once you get stuck in!
 

Twisterowner

New member
Joined
23 Jul 2005
Messages
6,876
Re: Acute illness - Fear

[ QUOTE ]
I used to fly microlights and worry about , and prepare for, engine faliures on every flight.

[/ QUOTE ]

I used to fly gliders and never worried about engine failures!

Seriously, perhaps that shows that simplicity is a major factor in feeling "safe". The more things that can go wrong the more you have to worry about.
[Excuse me now, just got to go and throw my engine, gps, echo sounder over the wall!]
 

Saddletramp

New member
Joined
11 Jul 2007
Messages
1,036
Location
London
There is an account of how a single hander dislocated his index finger resulting in him passing out in the recent AZAB.
(new to this so can not do the fiddly bits with the link yet)

Just goes to show you can not guard against everything.
<span style="color:blue"> </span>
However, I will be looking into how I can reduce the sharp edges in the boat (with foam etc) Having recently aquired a few bruises after turning the cabin floor into a skating rink following a diesel leak.
 

Noddy

Member
Joined
22 Jun 2005
Messages
621
Location
Thames Estuary
[ QUOTE ]
There is an account of how a single hander dislocated his index finger resulting in him passing out in the recent AZAB.

[/ QUOTE ]

Now I'm starting to feel anxious just thinking about that! /forums/images/graemlins/frown.gif
 

Saddletramp

New member
Joined
11 Jul 2007
Messages
1,036
Location
London
Now I'm starting to feel anxious just thinking about that! /forums/images/graemlins/frown.gif

[/ QUOTE ]

Feeling anxious is probably worse for your health.

The story has a happy ending, which is the main thing I suppose. /forums/images/graemlins/ooo.gif
 
Joined
20 Jul 2001
Messages
205
Location
Southampton, UK
The Ships Captains Medical certificate gives you some good info on how to stretch out the survival time between an illness biting, and getting to help. It also allows you to carry restricted anti-biotics and painkillers aboard. (Three day course, with certificate. Worth doing, although mine has lapsed!)

I seem to recall that Sir Francis Chichester had his appendix removed as a precaution before his circumnavigation, and some single-handers have actually managed to operate on themselves (setting broken bones and the like) with help from a doctor on a radio!

Tristan Jones ( I think) once famously reinserted an eye that had been knocked out by a boom! (I don't know if the eye still worked afterwards, mind you..)

When it comes to illnesses or other bodily damage, I still think we're safer out there than ashore. Nearly got written off yesterday by a woman looking the wrong way into a T-junction (think she was Polish, according to the plates) and had two near misses the week before.

If I did end up in hospital, then the chances are I'd pick up another infection, such as MRSA, or spend ages waiting to be seen!

On the roads, I'm outnumbered 14 million to one. At sea, the odds are a lot lower, the carriageways further apart, and the air a lot cleaner!

Illness is a worry with no-one else to help when afloat, but - according to Jimmy Cornell - a lot of sailors are far healthier at sea than on land. Being fitter and happier boosts the immune system anyway.

That said, I'm still going to practice using a scalpel with a mirror....
 

Allan

Well-known member
Joined
17 Mar 2004
Messages
4,392
Location
Bristol
As I don't plan to be on the Jester I feel a bit of a fraud posting here. When I read your post, the first thing I thought was, lucky bloke! one less worry when he is out on his own.
Allan
 

bumblefish

Active member
Joined
22 Dec 2002
Messages
1,572
Location
Brighton
Just help me get to the start line and I will follow you all over with antibiotics, pain killers, scalpel, splints, suppositories and what ever else you fancy! No Captain's Medical Certificate, but I do have an Advanced Life Support Instructor cert', a couple of medical degrees and 25 years doing the sick! How is that for an encouragement to bring me along? And I will wash my hands!
 

andlauer

New member
Joined
15 Mar 2007
Messages
310
Location
Paris France
Bonjour
In france there is a medical course for isolated situation dedicated to round the world sailing...
It takes a week end and learns you how to act as the "hand" and "eyes" of the doctor. It also provides you with a list of medecine you may carry and use only under the distant doctor instruction. You also learn to use snapples, steristrip...
I followed it and it gives you confidence for medical issues.
there is also in Toulouse at hospital a specialised service for distant medecine. You may connect them through the coastguards (CROSS) in french of course.
For appendicite issue exemple, a racer had an attack during a transatlantic race. he was treated with massive antibiotics and refused to be rescued because he wanted to finish the race. he was treated after he arrived.
If you don't have such a course in GBland, I could provide a contact. The doctor that provided the course may speek english.
Eric /forums/images/graemlins/smile.gif
 
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